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Josh Bartrug cools himself off from the Baltimore City Fire Department water sprinklers at Artscape 2019 in Baltimore, MD.
Josh Bartrug cools himself off from the Baltimore City Fire Department water sprinklers at Artscape 2019 in Baltimore, MD. (Xavier Plater / Baltimore Sun)

Sunday in the Baltimore area is forecast to feel like 110 degrees.

The high temperature is expected to reach 99 degrees, but when factoring humidity it will feel a lot hotter, according to the National Weather Service. If the forecast holds true, Sunday will be the 10th straight day the thermostat climbed to the 90s or higher.

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Saturday’s high reached at least 100 degrees at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. It is only the second time in seven years the area was that hot. Though the heat index has reached the triple digits around Baltimore in recent summers, air temperatures have not reached that mark at the region’s point of record since July 25, 2016.

An excessive heat warning was in effect for much of the East Coast and parts of the Midwest Saturday, including a “Code Orange" alert for parts of the country. The warning indicates that the air is unhealthy for children, the elderly or people with heart or lung conditions. Officials encourage people to check on older relatives and neighbors to keep an eye out for any confusion or nausea, both of which are among signs of a heat-related illness.

Relief is expected next week. Rain should cool things down Monday, with highs in the 80s. Tuesday’s temperature is expected to reach 82 degrees.

Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Letitia Dzirasa warned that heat is the leading weather-related killer in the United States.

"The effects of extreme heat are exacerbated in urban areas, especially when combined with high humidity and poor air quality,” Dzirasa said in a statement.

Besides pools and slash pads, the city is be operating multiple cooling centers. Call 311 for locations and hours.

Dzirasa said people should drink lots of water, avoid alcohol and caffeine and seek air-conditioning.

Baltimore Sun reporter Scott Dance contributed to this article.

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