xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Maryland weather: Thunderstorms bring strong wind gusts Friday evening

Severe weather across Maryland Friday evening caused flash flooding near the Jones Falls Expressway and may have produced a tornado in Anne Arundel County, according to meteorologists.

Flooding was reported around 9:30 p.m. on I-83 near the onramp. The tornado was reported by a bystander at Sandy Point in Anne Arundel County crossing the beach near Spences Point Road at 7:58 p.m.

Advertisement

Still, the National Weather Service reported around 9:40 p.m. that scattered thunderstorms had lessened across the region, expecting light rain and mist to continue overnight.

Forecasters expected wind gusts to reach up to 21 miles per hour Friday evening and said there was a marginal chance for severe thunderstorms to occur in Central Maryland, with the greatest risk between midafternoon and 10 p.m.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Around 8 p.m., meteorologists said radar showed up to an inch of heavy rainfall from Sykesville to Dundalk. Forecasters expect new rainfall in the Baltimore area could reach up to one inch Friday night, with temperatures in the lower 50s.

The National Weather Service recorded just two 911 calls for downed trees blocking roads in Charles County around 6:30 p.m., and several trees blown over by wind gusts in Virginia.

A Marine Warning was in place until 9:45 p.m. in the Chesapeake Bay from Drum Point in Calvert County to Smith Point, Virginia, but was canceled.

A Small Craft Advisory is in place from 6 a.m. until 6 p.m. Saturday in the Patapsco River and Baltimore Harbor.

Advertisement

In the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan region, Baltimore Gas & Electric reported 34 outages as of 8:50 p.m., affecting 899 customers.

Light rain is expected to fall overnight and into a cloudy weekend as a cold front moves south, forecasters say, with temperatures in the mid- and upper 50s.

There’s a 70% chance of rain Saturday and 40% chance of rain Sunday. Meteorologists don’t expect the weather to be hazardous.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement