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See International Space Station, and a rocket bound for it, in Monday night sky

The International Space Station as seen from the space shuttle Endeavor on May 29, 2011.
The International Space Station as seen from the space shuttle Endeavor on May 29, 2011. (NASA)

The International Space Station will pass over the region Monday evening, and it's likely your last chance to see a flyover while Cockeysville native Reid Wiseman is aboard the satellite.

The flyover also coincides with the launch of a rocket bound for the space station, carrying a new round of supplies.

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The space station will pass from northwest to southeast from about 6:47 p.m. until 6:57 p.m. It will pass directly overhead, right in front of the bright star Lyra in the center of the sky.
The Antares rocket, being launched from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the southern Delmarva peninsula, is meanwhile expected to appear during the same window, about 6:49 p.m.

The space station appears as a steadily moving spot of light, brighter than a star but more distant than an airplane.

NASA’s Wiseman is due land back on Earth on Nov. 10 in Kazakhstan -- one day before his 39th birthday.
The space station will make a few passes directly over the region before then, but none will be bright enough to easily spot. The next good chance to see it comes Nov. 10, but it's possible that will be just a matter of hours after Wiseman's scheduled landing.
The rocket will appear arcing in the southeastern sky when viewed from Baltimore. 

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