xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Big chill coming Wednesday night; wintry precipitation could be ahead

Frigid cold reaching across the country is forecast to arrive in Maryland by Wednesday night, bringing chances for wintry precipitation Thursday and Sunday nights.

Though temperatures surged to the middle to upper 60s Wednesday morning, they are expected to come crashing down 30 degrees by early Thursday morning. Temperatures are expected to stay in the 40s nearly all day Thursday, and then coming close to or below the freezing mark by early Friday morning. Lows could be in the 20s across the region this weekend.

Advertisement

Frigid cold has already set in over the western two-thirds of the country, moving eastward as the week goes on.

Whether any precipitation will coincide with the chilly temperatures is not clear, as forecast models continue to shift.

Advertisement

Some light precipitation is forecast to move in Thursday behind a cold front that is expected to pass through Wednesday. That could bring a mix of rain and snow showers Thursday night into Friday morning from central Virginia to southern New England.

The National Weather Service's Baltimore/Washington forecast office calls for rain showers Thursday night, possibly turning to a wintry mix of precipitation closer to midnight.

AccuWeather.com's forecast doesn't even mention any precipitation chances Thursday or Friday, nor does the Weather Channel's.

Local meteorologist "Eric the Red" says of snow's appearance in the forecast: "A bunch of close calls, but nothing of substance."

Another chance of wintry precipitation could come Sunday night. The weather service predicts a 50 percent chance of a wintry mix overnight Sunday into Monday morning.

Regardless of any precipitation chances, forecasters agree -- the cold will be sticking around through the middle part of the month.

It was about this time last year that Baltimore saw its first snowflakes of the season. At Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, officials measured a trace of snow Nov. 12.

Measurable snow is rare in November in the region, with either no snow or a trace in most years. But it used to be more common — more than a trace fell in November five times in the 1960s and four times in the 1970s, but only four times since 1990.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement