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Ellicott City's historic district was inundated with surging flood waters Sunday, devastating buildings and property. The severe storms also caused damage throughout the Baltimore area.

After two disastrous floods in three years, residents and business owners contemplate what's next.

A week after floodwaters tore through Ellicott City for the second time in two years, Howard County stakeholders are raising questions about whether they should contribute to the town’s future — and whether they were alerted to the flood emergency in a timely manner,

Though the damage to Main Street Ballroom was less severe than anticipated, owner Kate Ansari said she expects it to take six weeks to reopen — leaving 10 couples temporarily without a place to wed. Since then, event-industry professionals have volunteered their services to help couple relocate.

Howard County has provided hotel rooms to 59 displaced residents, county spokesman Paul Milton said. An undetermined number of others — including one couple whose home might have to be demolished — are staying with local friends or family members.

Ellicott City native Ron Peters finished installing a network of surveillance cameras weeks before the town suffered its second devastating flood in two years. The footage it captured shows the flood developing in dramatic fashion.

The following timeline of the flooding shows just how quickly the rain morphed Old Ellicott City into a deadly flood zone.

After Ellicott City suffered the deadly and devastating flash flood of 2016, the Howard County government commissioned an engineering study to determine how much it would cost to make the historic mill town safer. The answer: A lot.

With Ellicott City ravaged by floodwaters for the second time in since 2016, relief efforts are underway for those businesses and residents affected. Here are some ways you can help.

Ellicott City’s historic district has long been a shopping and dining destination for many, despite the threat of periodic floods throughout its history. But after the second major flood in two years, business owners are facing the difficult question of whether to rebuild — again.

“After a lot of soul searching and a lot of heartbreak, we feel that as badly as we want to come back, we cannot in good conscience rebuild in E.C.," Gretchen Shuey, 48, the owner of Bean Hollow, announced on Facebook.

Business owners and volunteers began the “muck out work” in earnest on Sunday, following a deadly flood that county officials said was even more destructive than one in 2016. 

Archbishop of Baltimore William E. Lori prayed for Eddison Hermond, the National Guardsman killed in Ellicott City's flood, and others affected by the flood during a Saturday at a mass at St. Paul Catholic Church.

An iconic clock knocked over and swept away in last week's floods in Ellicott City has been found and retrieved.

Many small businesses in Old Ellicott City, devastated by the second major flood since 2016, did not have flood insurance and will rely on the community and disaster aid if they choose to reopen.

The friends and family of the National Guardsman who died after being swept away in the Ellicott City flood on Sunday have set up a scholarship fund in his honor through the Restaurant Association of Maryland.

Funeral arrangements have been set for the Army National Guardsman who was swept away by floodwaters while attempting to rescue someone in Ellicott City last weekend.

Howard County officials said Friday they were providing temporary housing for dozens of Ellicott City residents who were displaced by flooding.

The floods that shuttered businesses in Ellicott City last weekend also put many people out of work.

Baltimore area bars and restaurants and other establishments are announcing fundraisers to benefit victims of the flooding in Ellicott City

The home of Dan and Kay Broadwater was the only house in Baltimore County to be declared "unsafe" by county authorities after Sunday's heavy rains caused flooding throughout Baltimore and Howard counties.

The Catonsville Chamber of Commerce is raising money to help Catonsville business owners who were affected by recent flooding through an online portal and by collecting donations at its Frederick Road Fridays event series.

While the destruction in Old Ellicott City 6 miles away garnered international attention, the same storm displaced at least six people from their homes in Southwest Baltimore's Beechfield neighborhood.

Crews had to clear detritus of all types from storm drains and stream banks after Sunday's flooding in Ellicott City. But they also managed to recover something worth saving — a massive stone that was once used to grind grain in the old mill town.

Howard County officials did their best to provide answers at an information session Wednesday for residents and business owners affected by the flood.

A man’s body was found in the Patapsco River on Tuesday, days after flooding devastated Ellicott City and the surrounding region, according to Howard County Police.

Residents and shop owners were lined up outside the George Howard building waiting for credentials and access Tuesday morning, with some calling the situation a case of “twisted deja vu” from the disastrous flood in 2016.

Thirty-six hours after floods washed away residents and shop owners’ livlihoods in historic Ellicott City, relief began at the county’s Disaster Assistance Center, set up at the Ellicott City 50+ Center.

The heavy winds and downpours that consumed Ellicott City this weekend formed a rare 1,000-year-storm. But what exactly does that mean?

Trapped and in disbelief, freelance photographer Max Robinson began chronicling the storm on Twitter with videos, photos and commentary. His account went viral and even got the attention of media outlets.

Howard County officials are searching for a man reported missing from Sunday’s devastating floods in historic Ellicott City.

Residents, merchants and officials in Ellicott City awoke Monday to examine the devastation wrought by floods that coursed through the historic mill town the night before — the second time in less than two years. Many immediately began to ask the question: Should we rebuild again?

The storm that hit historic Ellicott City and nearby areas Sunday is likely worse than the storm that caused flooding in 2016, according to meteorologists.

Ellicott City assesses damage the day after a flood ravaged its historic Main Street for the second time in two years.

Torrential rains on Sunday caused flooding in Catonsville and Oella, chewing up pavement, toppling trees and flooding homes.

The torrential flooding in Ellicott City disrupted a wedding at the Main Street Ballroom on Sunday — but the bride and groom still managed to tie the knot, even after evacuating.

Donations quickly began piling up on Monday for victims of devastating flooding in Old Ellicott City the night before.

The deluge of rain that caused flash flooding in Ellicott City and across the Baltimore region Sunday prompted the evacuation of at least three businesses in the city’s Woodberry neighborhood, according to the Mayor’s Office of Emergency Management.

The Mayor of Sykesville said Monday that the town recovered from minor flooding quickly after the May 27 rainstorm hit the region and brought water levels higher than the drains downtown, flooded the Baldwin’s Station parking lot and got into some basements on Main Street.

Heavy rains in Baltimore area have caused flooding and challenging driving conditions.

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