xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Maryland men’s basketball guard Aquan Smart enters transfer portal

Alabama made 16 three-pointers for the game and lead by as much as 23, while the Terps' had no answer for the Tides' long-range shots.

Maryland men’s basketball guard Aquan Smart has entered his name into the NCAA transfer portal, he announced Thursday on Twitter, becoming the third Terp to do so since the season ended with a second-round loss to Alabama.

Smart was a three-star recruit out of Niles North High School in Evanston, Illinois, from the Class of 2020. He averaged 1.4 points and 7.3 minutes per game but was phased out of Maryland’s lineup by February as coach Mark Turgeon thinned his rotation late in the season.

Advertisement

“After talking with my mother and family, I feel as if it’s best for me to enter my name into the transfer portal,” Smart wrote after thanking fans, the coaching staff and his teammates. “I am very excited for this next chapter in my life.”

Smart joins sophomore center Chol Marial, who last week announced his intention to transfer. Senior guard Darryl Morsell (Mount Saint Joseph) also announced earlier this week that he entered his name in the portal and declared for the NBA draft, although he kept open the possibility of returning to the Terps with an extra year of eligibility.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Maryland coach Mark Turgeon, who signed a three-year extension Wednesday, welcomed incoming transfers Qudus Wahab and Fatts Russell last week to what could be a deep roster — especially if Aaron Wiggins, Eric Ayala and Darryl Morsell return.

The NCAA transfer portal was introduced in the fall of 2018 to allow players to make it known of their intention to transfer and for college coaches to see which players might be available to sign national letters of intent. While players who enter the transfer portal are permitted to rescind their names and return to their schools, the program is no longer obligated to honor the scholarship.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement