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Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson, left, and Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany during the "Maryland to the Big Ten: Charting the Future, Remembering the Past" panel discussion at the eighth annual Shirley Povich Symposium.
Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson, left, and Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany during the "Maryland to the Big Ten: Charting the Future, Remembering the Past" panel discussion at the eighth annual Shirley Povich Symposium. (Kenneth K. Lam / Baltimore Sun)

With a men's basketball Sweet 16 appearance and five Big Ten tournament championships, the Maryland athletic department's revenue increased in 2015-16, though it still ranks behind most conference foes.

Maryland made $94,101,697 in total revenue for the year, according to the athletic department revenue database USA Today released Thursday.

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The Terps are No. 36 out of 230 schools listed and 11th of the Big Ten's 13 public universities. Northwestern, a private school, wasn't included.

Former Maryland point guard Melo Trimble has played in just one of the Philadephia 76ers' Summer League games.

USA Today calculated each school's total revenue from six categories.

Maryland made money from ticket sales ($16,493,833), outside contributions ($13,676,004), rights/licensing ($46,175,076), student fees ($11,630,126), school funds ($3,789,312) and other aspects, such as game guarantees and TV income ($2,337,346).

The expenses — the department broke even last year — stemmed from four areas: coaching and staff salaries ($32,561,820), scholarships ($15,644,238), facilities/overhead ($17,822,807) and other aspects that include severance payments to past coaches and employees, recruiting, travel and conference dues ($28,072,832).

Maryland had a $1,415,569 increase in revenue from 2014-15 with improved ticket sales, contributions and school funding.

The Americans will play Germany on Friday.

In the 2015-16 season, for example, the men's basketball team reached the Sweet 16 for the first time in 13 years.

The Terps, led by then-sophomore Melo Trimble and a starting lineup with Rasheed Sulaimon, Jake Layman, Diamond Stone and Robert Carter Jr., were in the top 10 for most of the season. Xfinity Center attendance ranked fifth in the nation with an average of 17,863 fans a game, about 5,000 more than the season before.

USA Today's records show Maryland's total revenue has improved by almost $40 million in the past seven years.

In 2009-10, about two years before Maryland cut seven sports when the university was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference, its revenue was $54,661,992.

A year before the Terps joined the Big Ten in July 2014, the athletic department brought in $73,434,896. That rose to $92,686,128 in its inaugural year in the Big Ten.

But the Terps' revenue from their second season after switching conferences didn't match that of their new rivals.

Here's how the Big Ten compares:

Ohio State: $170,789,765 (third nationally)

Michigan: $163,850,616 (fifth)

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Wisconsin: $132,788,726 (11th)

Penn State: $132,248,076 (12th)

Michigan State: 123,034,495 (16th)

Minnesota: $113,506,279 (19th)

Iowa: $113,249,020 (20th)

Nebraska: $112,142,961 (22nd)

Illinois: $96,249,500 (31st)

Indiana: $95,216,762 (32nd)

Maryland: $94,101,697 (36th)

Rutgers: $83,974,159 (40th)

Purdue: $78,699,976 (47th)

After a rookie year with the Los Angeles Clippers, Stone will join the Atlanta Hawks.

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