Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany speaks during the "Maryland to the Big Ten: Charting the Future, Remembering the Past" panel discussion at the eighth annual Shirley Povich Symposium.
Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany speaks during the "Maryland to the Big Ten: Charting the Future, Remembering the Past" panel discussion at the eighth annual Shirley Povich Symposium. (Kenneth K. Lam / Baltimore Sun)

Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany said during the league's media day at Madison Square Garden that the latest college basketball scandal is not surprising, given what has transpired in the sport for decades.

"I'm not shocked about this," Delany said. "This is the ninth or tenth intersection between college basketball and the FBI going back to 1950."

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Long before he became a basketball player at North Carolina, and later a conference commissioner, Delany has memories from his childhood in New Jersey about one of the scandals.

"I grew up across the river in New Jersey, and waking up as a 12-year-old and seeing two individuals being taken out of their dormitory in handcuffs by the FBI. for their engagement — alleged engagement in gambling," he said.

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Delany said that he has talked with his league's coaches and athletic directors about the scandal, which has not impacted the Big Ten, but has seen the firing of Hall of Fame coach Rick Pitino at Louisville and the arrest of four Division I assistant coaches.

"Yeah, we're all concerned, and we should be," Delany said. "We don't know what we don't know. We sort of know what you know, what we read about in the paper. We've had no contact with the government.

"We really don't have any facts other than what we've read. I'm sure it will unfold and it we'll learn more as things, as investigations become more public."

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