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Instant analysis of Terps' 31-30 loss to Penn State

Daniel Gallen, sports reporter: For the first time in a month, Maryland was within striking distance of a victory in the fourth quarter of a game. But once again, the Terps fell short because of turnovers and poor execution. Though he turned in another gutsy effort with 349 yards of total offense and two touchdowns, quarterback Perry Hills turned the ball over five times (three interceptions, two fumbles), including a pick that essentially ended the game for the Terps. Maryland's struggles in Penn State territory in the first half came back to haunt the Terps down the stretch, too. In seven trips across the 50 in the first 15 minutes, the Terps scored only 13 points.

Peter Schmuck, columnist: The Terps definitely left everything out on the field, including a couple of balls on the turf. Considering the ridiculous number of turnovers, they were lucky to lose by just one point, but they were also unlucky at several junctures. Oh well, at least they put on a show for a big crowd at M&T Bank Stadium and nearly sent the Nittany Lions reeling for a second straight year. There's a rivalry to be had here, but it's going to take some time to fully develop.

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Ron Fritz, sports editor: Great day for a football game at M&T. Well contested, just not well played. Either team could have won and as usually is the case, the team with the fewest turnovers and the ball last won. The win makes Penn State bowl-eligible.

Don Markus, sports reporter: What would have been a fairy-tale ending in Mike Locksley's first game as Maryland's interim coach didn't happen when Perry Hills committed his fifth and final turnover. Still, the Terps played with more emotion and in some cases more imagination than at any time since Ralph Friedgen was the team's coach.

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