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Amba Etta-Tawo working his way into Terps' receiver rotation

Maryland receiver Amba Etta-Tawo started in place of junior Marcus Leak against Wisconsin and will likely see time Saturday at Penn State.
Maryland receiver Amba Etta-Tawo started in place of junior Marcus Leak against Wisconsin and will likely see time Saturday at Penn State.

COLLEGE PARK — Maryland wide receiver Amba Etta-Tawo got his opportunity against Iowa on Oct. 18, a chance to finally get in on offense and contribute after primarily watching from the sideline for the first six games.

Etta-Tawo took advantage and has continued to re-establish himself as a part of the Terps' wide receiver rotation in the weeks since.

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The long-armed 6-foot-1, 200-pound sophomore started in place of junior Marcus Leak against Wisconsin last week and will likely see time Saturday at Penn State.

"I like the way he is coming along," Maryland offensive coordinator Mike Locksley said, "and he's giving us the ability to rotate some guys in there and keep fast, healthy guys [on the field] and guys that are well rested and are able to play fast like we want to."

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Etta-Tawo had 31 catches for 500 yards and two touchdowns as a freshman last season while flashing the ability to get behind defenders, make big plays and win in jump-ball situations.

While Etta-Tawo did not have a catch against Wisconsin, he had three receptions for 46 yards during the second half against Iowa, including a 26-yard catch along the sideline to convert a third-and-10 during the fourth quarter.

"Amba is one of the fastest guys [on the team]," Locksley said. "A lot of the things we do [depend on] short area quickness where you have to get in and out of a cut, so being a fast guy and as long and as tall as he is, he is inclined to be a guy that you run the deep ball with, the posts, the comebacks. Whereas in the screen game, the short and intermediate throws where you have to get in and out of breaks, you have to have a little more lateral quickness. …

"He has done a great job. He's one of our better blockers and that's why he started last week. He shows the ability when we need to block on the perimeter, he'll get the job done. He's played in games. He's shown he can vertically stretch the field and make plays like he did two weeks ago."

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