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After struggling vs. Fordham, Terps' Dez Wells ready to 'keep pushing'

Terps senior guard Dez Wells.
Terps senior guard Dez Wells. (Karl Merton Ferron, Baltimore Sun)

COLLEGE PARK — Dez Wells spent the summer refining his game to include a more accurate jump shot with greater range, as well a more controlled pace to help him commit fewer fouls and turnovers.

In Maryland's first two games, blowout wins over Wagner and Central Connecticut State, the senior guard hit 18 of 26 shots and four of his five 3-point attempts, including all three in the second game.

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After committing just one turnover and one personal foul against Wagner, Wells turned the ball over three times and had three fouls against Central Connecticut State.

Wells, an early season candidate for the John Wooden National Player of the Year award, regressed in Thursday's 66-50 win over Fordham. He had just eight points, shooting 3 of 6 from the field, and had more turnovers (four) than assists (three).

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"I felt like my play wasn't to the level of excellence I feel I can play at, each and every night," Wells said when asked how he thought he played. "Just a lot of mistakes. I didn't think I played great at all, that's the pressure I put on myself each and every time out."

Maryland coach Mark Turgeon said Saturday after practice that Wells realized how poorly he played and came in Friday to watch tape with new assistant coach Cliff Warren.

"It's just a process, [Wells] wants it to be perfect, and it's not going to be perfect. He was definitely pressing the entire game the other night," Turgeon said. "He's got to keep working on it because when he's at a good pace, we're a much better team."

Asked why Wells might have been pressing, Turgeon said: "Just wants it to go great. Maybe we expected to win by 40, you're not going to win every game by 30 points. Just that made him press a little bit."

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Wells admitted that was partly true.

"I want to be good every time I touch the floor, and that can backfire in some areas," Wells said. "You've got to take it as one game of many and keep moving forward with it. That game really doesn't define my season. We've just got to keep going, keep pushing."

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