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Ravens rookie OL Tyre Phillips, a potential Week 1 starter, misses practice Thursday

Ravens rookie offensive lineman Tyre Phillips, who could start at right guard in the team’s season opener Sunday, was one of four players who missed practice Thursday.

It was first absence for Phillips, who is dealing with an ankle injury, since the start of training camp, and it comes three days before the Ravens face the Cleveland Browns at M&T Bank Stadium. D.J. Fluker started training camp as the favorite to replace Pro Bowl guard Marshal Yanda before Phillips, a third-round pick, came on strong.

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Wide receiver Chris Moore (finger), running back Justice Hill (thigh) and rookie defensive tackle Justin Madubuike (knee) remain out. While all three would be strong candidates for the team’s game day roster, they’re increasingly unlikely to be activated.

For the Browns, offensive tackle Chris Hubbard (ankle), cornerbacks Kevin Johnson (liver) and Greedy Williams (shoulder) and linebacker Mack Wilson (knee) all missed practice, and defensive back MJ Stewart Jr. (hamstring) and center JC Tretter (knee) were limited participants for the second straight day.

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QB Griffin doesn’t owe ex-agent money, judge rules

U.S. District Judge Stephen R. Clark ruled on Wednesday that Ravens backup quarterback Robert Griffin III does not owe $658,000 to his former agent, Ben Dogra, in marketing commissions from 2014 to 2016 because the statute of limitations has expired.

Dogra sued Griffin on March 22, 2019, in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri. According to Above The Law, Clark said the California statute of limitations says an action upon contract not founded upon an instrument of writing must be brought within two years.

Dogra claimed that his former agency, Creative Artists Agency, did not discover the cause of action for breach of contract until 2018 because CAA was never informed until then that Griffin intended not to pay.

“The Court finds the discovery rule has no bearing on this case because CAA Sports knew, or should have known, at all relevant times that Griffin had not paid,” Clark wrote in his order. “CAA Sports could have sued Griffin for failure to pay the fees at the time they came due.”

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