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Ravens’ John Harbaugh says he received no word from officials on controversial final play vs. Steelers

Minutes after the Ravens' 28-24 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers, coach John Harbaugh said he wasn’t given a definitive answer from officials on the controversial hit wide receiver Willie Snead IV suffered as time expired that caused quarterback Lamar Jackson’s pass into the end zone to fall incomplete.

On the final play of the game, Jackson targeted Snead on a seam route in the end zone for the potential game-winning touchdown. Safety Minkah Fitzpatrick looked to be making a play on the ball and crashed into Snead, making contact with Snead’s helmet, while cornerback Justin Layne upended Snead from behind.

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No flags were thrown, and players from both sidelines began to walk onto the field as time expired. During the end of the CBS broadcast, Harbaugh was shown pointing to his head, perhaps indicating that the Steelers should have been called for a personal foul on the play.

“As far as the last play — the shoulder to the helmet — no. They didn’t say a word about it. [The referees] just ran off the field,” Harbaugh said.

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Snead called the hit a “bang-bang play.”

“It could have [gone] either way, to be honest,” Snead said. “When I got hit, it just happened so [quickly]. As soon as the ball touched my hands, I got hit. I didn’t know how he hit me, seriously, but I got hit in the head. So I’ll just leave it at that.”

CBS Sports rules analyst and former NFL referee Gene Steratore wrote on Twitter that “Minkah Fitzpatrick is making a play on the ball so the contact to the receiver is not a foul. Any incidental contact by an opponent’s hands, arms, or body when both players are competing for the ball isn’t a penalty.”

The incompletion to Snead wasn’t the only controversial moment in the final minute. Facing fourth-and-2 from the Ravens' 45-yard-line, Jackson completed a 32-yard pass to Snead. As Ravens players hurried to get set at the line of scrimmage and spike the ball to stop the clock, Steelers defensive lineman Cameron Heyward lay writhing in pain several yards behind.

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Heyward had exited the game earlier because of a leg injury.

The referees did not call the play dead until right as Jackson spiked the ball, with eight seconds remaining. Although officials called off the play because of an injury timeout, they did not add any extra time to the clock. The Ravens ended up running two more plays before the end of the game.

Terry McAulay, a former NFL referee and current rules analyst for “Sunday Night Football,” wrote on Twitter that the “the referee should have immediately recognized his mistake and adjusted the clock to somewhere between [16 and 18 seconds].”

“I asked about the time, I got no answer on that. I think they said the time was fine,” Harbaugh said.

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