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Former Raven Alex Collins, friend dispute who owned marijuana found in his car, charging documents say

Ravens running back Alex Collins was arrested Friday morning following a car crash in Owings Mills, according to Baltimore County police and the team.

Former Ravens running back Alex Collins and his friend are disputing who owned the 143 grams of marijuana found in Collins’ car when they were arrested last week after a crash in Owings Mills, according to charging documents.

Collins, 24, was arrested Friday morning on charges of marijuana possession, drug possession with intent to distribute and a handgun violation. His friend, Tykheem Jaquon “TJ” Deundrea Dunaway, 28, who had been riding in Collins’ 2016 Chevrolet Corvette at the time of the accident, was also arrested and charged with marijuana possession and intent to distribute.

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Charging documents for Collins call into question whose marijuana was in the car.

Collins and Dunaway left a party in Towson about 4 a.m. Friday, and Collins was driving Dunaway home in his Corvette, which had expired tags, according to charging documents. Collins’ car slid off the snow-covered pavement in the 10000 block of Dolfield Road, about a mile from the Ravens’ training center. After the accident, Dunaway walked home, and Collins fell asleep in his car waiting for a tow truck.

A Baltimore County police officer who responded to the crash smelled marijuana and asked Collins how much was in the car. “He advised that it wasn’t his and that he did not have an idea as to how much was there,” according to charging documents.

Police said they found a clear glass jar containing about 5 ounces of marijuana on the passenger side floor board under a dark jacket, as well as a black revolver on the driver’s side floor board.

Dunaway returned to the scene after Collins called him, police said. Dunaway told police he was in the car when it crashed, that the marijuana belonged to Collins and he did not know it was in the vehicle until after the accident, according to charging documents.

“Dunaway indicated that he offered to take the marijuana even though it was not his,” charging documents said. “Later, Tykheem Dunaway communicated that he knew marijuana was inside the car as everyone was smoking at a party, but did not know it was that much.”

When police interviewed Dunaway later, he told officers he did not see the marijuana in the car until after the crash. “Dunaway advised that he has observed large amounts of marijuana inside Collins’ residence and knows him to often possess the same,” charging documents said.

But Collins maintained that the drugs in his car did not belong to him. In an interview, Collins told police he noticed Dunaway carrying the jar of marijuana as they left the party, charging documents said. Collins acknowledged owning the handgun in the car and told police he had other guns at this home. Police said they found two rifles and several hundred rounds of ammunition in his home while executing a search warrant.

Collins also told police he had “personal use amounts” of marijuana in his home, which “would just be laying around.” Police found less than 10 grams on his dining room table, according to charging documents.

The Ravens waived Collins hours after his arrest, and he was released on $7,500 bail early Saturday after an initial appearance in U.S. District Court for Maryland. Dunaway was also released on a $5,000 bond.

Collins’ attorney, Andrew I. Aperstein, declined to comment. Dunaway could not be reached for comment and did not have an attorney listed in online court records.

The Ravens declined to comment Monday.

Dunaway found himself in a similar situation in September 2016 with Collins’ future Ravens teammate, Tim Williams, when University of Alabama campus police stopped Dunaway, Williams and another man about 1 a.m. in the parking lot of a grocery store. They found a bag of marijuana in the center console of Williams’ car and a Glock 41 pistol under the driver’s seat, according to reports at the time.

Dunaway was charged with second-degree possession of marijuana in that case. The outcome of the case was unclear. Williams told police he had bought the gun while home in Louisiana and had a temporary permit for it, the Associated Press reported at the time. Although he did not have the permit, he was able to produce a receipt for the gun and was released on $300 bond.

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Baltimore Sun reporter Colin Campbell contributed to this article.

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