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Ravens kicker Justin Tucker shrugs off history, focuses on kicking at Heinz Field

On Sunday night, the Ravens' Justin Tucker overtook the Dallas Cowboys' Dan Bailey as the most accurate kicker in NFL history with a career field-goal success rate of 89.6 (163-for-182) after Bailey missed two and slid to 89.4 percent (169-for-189).

But Tucker, who earned his second Pro Bowl nod and first since 2013 on Tuesday, shrugged off the accolade.

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"I guess it's kind of cool," he said. "Again, it's just another stat. I guess it's kind of a cool one to have attached to you, but I think we all know around here that the most important thing is the next kick, just making the next one and working hard in between our opportunities on Sunday."

Tucker is more concerned with improving his NFL lead in field goals made with 33 (on 34 attempts) against the Pittsburgh Steelers on Sunday. Heinz Field, the site of Sunday's game, has historically been ranked by observers and players as having one of the worst surfaces, but going to all-natural Kentucky bluegrass means the turf can be replaced frequently.

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Tucker, who has converted 12 of 13 field goals and all nine extra-point attempts in five career games at Heinz Field, said he expects the grass at outdoor stadiums in colder climates to be less than ideal.

"I think more than anything, it just makes me lock in just a little bit more and focus on getting great foot-to-ball contact, and that solves a lot of problems," he said.

Tucker said he can only recall one time when kicking at Heinz Field was slightly more difficult because of turf conditions.

"I guess I've been pretty fortunate that I haven't had to personally deal with really negative field conditions there in my time in the league," he said. "… Maybe one year, the conditions weren't ideal. It's still a grass surface, it's outside, we're north of the Mason-Dixon line. So it's not too different from our stadium now."

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End zone

Sunday's victory was particularly meaningful for Marty Mornhinweg, who spent 10 years in Philadelphia as a senior assistant, offensive coordinator and assistant head coach from 2003 to 2012. "Man, what a win that was, especially since I was in Philly for 10 years," he said. "It was sort of rewarding after that fact. I didn't think too much about it going in." … Michael Campanaro fielded just one punt Sunday, making a fair catch in the first quarter, but special teams coordinator Jerry Rosburg liked what he saw. "He had to chase the ball across the field and make it a very good catch right over there on the sideline on a fair-catch ball," Rosburg said. "That was not an easy play because the ball was kicked all the way across the field, and it could have gone either way. He did exactly what we wanted him to do in that situation."

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