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Ozzie Newsome's draft maneuvering could loom large for the Ravens

General manager Ozzie Newsome has made a trade in 15 straight drafts, so at some point this month, you'll probably see the Ravens get on or off the clock when you're not expecting it.

In fact, it's more a matter of when than if.

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Due to a number of factors heading into the 2017 draft, which gets underway April 27, the Ravens could be more active in trades than they normally are during draft time. Newsome said last week that some trade discussions have already started.

"We will evaluate that when we get to the pick. It is always based on the player that is there, and then what has been offered and how far we want to go back. All of that comes into play," Newsome said at last week's draft luncheon. "We have had some calls already [from] teams that are willing to move up to our spot, but they always qualify it by saying, 'If our player gets there.'"

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Newsome, whose team holds the 16th overall pick, said the Ravens will be open to moving both forward and back.

In last year's draft, they attempted to do both in the first couple of rounds. Sitting with the sixth overall pick, they tried to leapfrog the Jacksonville Jaguars and move into the Dallas Cowboys' spot at No. 4 to select Florida State cornerback Jalen Ramsey. The Cowboys wanted the Ravens' sixth overall pick and their third-round selection, which was too much for Newsome. The Jaguars drafted Ramsey at No. 5, and the Ravens stayed at six and selected Notre Dame offensive tackle Ronnie Stanley.

When the second round started, the Ravens had the 36th overall pick. However, they traded it to the Jaguars for the 38th overall selection and an extra fifth rounder. They then traded the 38th pick to the Miami Dolphins for their 42nd overall selection and an extra fourth rounder. So all told, after two trades and after eschewing opportunities to grab potential defensive difference makers Noah Spence and Myles Jack, the Ravens moved back six spots and selected linebacker Kamalei Correa and added to their draft haul with an extra fourth rounder, which became wide receiver Chris Moore, and an extra fifth rounder, which became pass rusher Matthew Judon.

There are plenty of reasons why you could see similar movement this month. The biggest is the Ravens only have seven picks to use on an extremely deep and talented draft class. They haven't had smaller than an eight-man draft class since 2010. They enter this draft looking to add a speedy running back, at least one receiver, one or two offensive linemen, at least one pass rusher and one or two defensive backs. They've also drafted a defensive lineman in eight straight drafts so you'd think that trend will continue after they lost Timmy Jernigan and Lawrence Guy.

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Clearly, they could use an extra pick or two to fill some of these spots.

Sitting in the middle of the first round, the Ravens also could be in prime territory for quarterback-needy teams to want to get to in order to grab the guy they covet. While it seems likely one or two of them will, there's no guarantee that Clemson's Deshaun Watson, North Carolina's Mitchell Trubisky or Notre Dame's DeShone Kizer go within the top dozen picks. There is also always a player or two that surprisingly drops out of the first half of the first round and becomes an option for teams that didn't expect that player would be available.

And don't forget part of Newsome's rationale for trading Jernigan to the Philadelphia Eagles in exchange for moving up 25 spots in the third round.

"The strength of the draft was one reason, but we think it is prime real estate when you are picking in the top 10 picks in a round, because the phone normally rings," Newsome said. "You have a chance to either pick a player that you really want, or you can probably trade back and acquire more picks if you so choose."

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