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Owings Mills graduate Donovan Smith selected in second round by Tampa Bay

Owings Mills graduate Donovan Smith selected in second round by Tampa Bay
Penn State offensive lineman Donovan Smith was selected 34th overall in the NFL draft by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. (Charles Rex Arbogast / Associated Press)

After using their first overall pick in the NFL draft on Thursday on a potential franchise quarterback in Florida State's Jameis Winston, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers bolstered their offensive line with Penn State tackle Donovan Smith.

Smith (Owings Mills), who earned all-state honors as a senior and played in the Army All-American Bowl in 2011, sat out his freshman year at Penn State but became a three-year starter on the improving Nittany Lions offense under coach Bill O'Brien and later, James Franklin.

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The 6-foot-5, 335-pound Smith started nine games as a sophomore, then 11 games as a junior and entered his senior season as an All-Big Ten Conference candidate. He missed two games because of injury last year.

Smith met with Ravens offensive line coach Juan Castillo at the NFL Scouting Combine, and attended the team's local scouting combine in late April. He visited the Philadelphia Eagles, Buffalo Bills, Detroit Lions, and San Francisco 49ers as well.

The NFL advisory committee recommended that he return to school for his fifth and final season of eligibility, as they didn't project him to be selected in the first two rounds of the draft.

But with four tackles taken in the first round, Tampa Bay chose Smith over potential first-round picks like T.J. Clemmings of Pittsburgh and LSU's La'el Collins (who is dealing with legal issues).

Smith is the earliest tackle selected by Tampa Bay since Boston College's Jeremy Trueblood went in the second round in 2006.

Smith was the second local product drafted in the first 34 picks of the NFL draft, with the Houston Texans selecting Wake Forest cornerback Kevin Johnson (River Hill) 16th overall.

Baltimore Sun reporter Aaron Wilson contributed to this article.

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