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Roberto Alomar’s status in Orioles Hall of Fame unclear after MLB, Blue Jays cut ties following sexual misconduct investigation

Orioles Hall of Famer Roberto Alomar was placed on baseball’s ineligible list Friday and lost a consultant job in MLB’s front office after the league investigated a 2014 sexual misconduct allegation from a baseball employee.

The Toronto Blue Jays quickly removed Alomar from their Level of Excellence at the Rogers Center.

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But his status with the Orioles Hall of Fame is unclear. The club has not responded to multiple requests for comment regarding the matter.

Commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement: “Having reviewed all of the available evidence from the now completed investigation, I have concluded that Mr. Alomar violated MLB’s policies, and that termination of his consultant contract and placement on MLB’s Ineligible List are warranted.

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In this Oct. 5, 1996, file photo, Roberto Alomar, right, of the Baltimore Orioles gets a high five from teammate Rafael Palmeiro at home plate, after a 12th-inning home run against the Cleveland Indians, at Cleveland.
In this Oct. 5, 1996, file photo, Roberto Alomar, right, of the Baltimore Orioles gets a high five from teammate Rafael Palmeiro at home plate, after a 12th-inning home run against the Cleveland Indians, at Cleveland. (Susan Walsh / Associated Press)

“We are grateful for the courage of the individual who came forward. MLB will continue to strive to create environments in which people feel comfortable speaking up without fear of recrimination, retaliation, or exclusion.”

Alomar, who was also let go from a special assistant job with the Blue Jays, said in a statement on Twitter that he was “disappointed, surprised, and upset” at the decision but “with the current social climate, I understand why Major League Baseball has taken the position they have.

“My hope is that this allegation can be heard in a venue that will allow me to address the accusation directly,” Alomar said.

Toronto supported MLB’s decision in a statement.

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“The Blue Jays are committed to advancing respect and equity in baseball and are taking further action by removing Alomar from the Level of Excellence and taking down his banner at Rogers Centre,” the team said.

Alomar spent 17 big league seasons with seven clubs, and was with the Orioles from 1996 to 1998 in the middle of a run of 12 straight seasons as an All-Star. The career .300 hitter with an .814 OPS hit .312 with an .862 OPS in three seasons with the Orioles and won two of his 10 Gold Glove awards while with the team.

Before the mid-2010s renaissance, those Orioles teams were the last contenders the club had. Alomar, playing with fellow Orioles Hall of Famers Cal Ripken Jr., Brady Anderson, Mike Bordick and Mike Mussina, made two trips to the American League Championship Series and won a division title in 1997.

His time with the team was not without controversy, though. In 1996, Alomar was suspended five games for spitting on umpire John Hirschbeck while arguing a called third strike.

Alomar was elected to the Orioles Hall of Fame in 2013, and said it was a “dream come true” despite his short time with the team.

“I never expected this phone call from the Orioles,” he said. “I only played here for three years and it caught me by surprise. But to be selected by such a great, elite group of players, it is an honor.”

By that time, Alomar was already in the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York. Despite the investigation, he will remain there.

Baseball Hall of Fame chair Jane Forbes Clark said that while the board was “shocked and saddened to learn of the findings, Alomar “was an eligible candidate in good standing” when he was elected to the Hall in 2011.

“His plaque will remain on display in the Hall of Fame in recognition of his accomplishments in the game, and his enshrinement reflects his eligibility and the perspective of the BBWAA voters at that time.”

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