Texas Rangers starting pitcher Andrew Cashner throws against the Seattle Mariners in the first inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in Seattle.
Texas Rangers starting pitcher Andrew Cashner throws against the Seattle Mariners in the first inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in Seattle. (Elaine Thompson / AP)

Peter Schmuck, columnist: The Orioles had to make a deal for a veteran starting pitcher and they did, so this is no time to pick it apart. Andrew Cashner had a pretty good season for the Texas Rangers in 2017, with 11 wins and a solid 3.40 ERA, so he's familiar with pitching in the American League. He had a decent hits-to-innings ratio and a middling 1.32 WHIP, but the Orioles are gambling $16 million on him being last year's pitcher and not the one who was 22 games under .500 with the San Diego Padres and Miami Marlins. If he is, it's a solid signing, but they still need one more experienced starter to flesh out their thin rotation.

Eduardo A. Encina, Orioles beat writer: We all knew the Orioles would strike with a free-agent signing during spring training. We knew they weren’t likely to make more than a two-year guaranteed commitment. Credit them for good timing and getting value by acquiring Cashner. And his addition of Cashner definitely gives the Orioles rotation an established veteran arm, but there’s still more work to do for anyone to consider the Orioles rotation significantly improved.

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Jon Meoli, Orioles beat writer: Now that spring training has begun, so has the Orioles offseason business in earnest. Signing Cashner fills a spot in the rotation, but like Yovani Gallardo two years ago, it’s on him to show that discounting his last season didn’t flatter him. Either way, he could take some pressure off a young rotation and give the rotation a bit of stability.

Analysis: As pitching search proceeds into spring training, Orioles wait for short-term deals

One lesson the Orioles have drawn from recent seasons is that multiyear contracts for starters are too risky.

Josh Land, Orioles editor: You can’t argue with the value. A veteran of 230 major league games and 137 starts on a two-year contract worth $8 million a year. The Orioles needed something, anything, and Cashner is at least an upgrade on Ubaldo Jiménez and Wade Miley. His peripheral stats aren’t impressive — he allows too many base runners and, at least last year, didn’t strike out enough batters. But he’s fine, and makes the Orioles better than they were when camp began.

Ron Fritz, sports editor: Wow, the Orioles actually signed a living, breathing starting pitcher. If you looked strictly at wins and losses, you’re not going to like his numbers. He was 11-11 last year and 42-64 in his career. But his ERA was 3.40 with the Rangers last season and his career ERA is 3.80. The Orioles’ best ERA among starters was Dylan Bundy’s 4.24. So this signing looks like value and gives the Orioles a third legitimate starting pitcher. I hope they told him the beard needs to go.

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