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Orioles announce plans to honor Frank Robinson's memory through 2019 season

The Baltimore Orioles honor Hall of Fame baseball player, Frank Robinson with a commemorative "20" patch that will be worn by the players and coaches during Spring Training and regualr season games. A large #20 was posted at Ed Smith Stadium stadium today in preperation for the start of Spring Training games.

Two days after unveiling their uniform sleeve patches to honor the legacy of Hall of Famer Frank Robinson, who died Feb. 7, the Orioles announced further plans to honor his memory during the 2019 season.

In addition to the uniform patches, which are black and feature Robinson's No. 20 in orange, the Orioles will donate $20,000 apiece to Baltimore's Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture, the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, and the National Museum of African American History & Culture in Washington.

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"Throughout his 50-year career in professional baseball, Frank Robinson blazed a trail for the African-American players, coaches, managers and executives who followed in his footsteps," executive vice president John Angelos said in a statement. "In honor of his tireless commitment to civil rights issues — including his efforts to improve housing opportunities for African Americans here in Baltimore — the Orioles will partner with three remarkable institutions that highlight the achievements of African Americans throughout our nation's history."

The Orioles will begin their commemorations at Saturday's Grapefruit League opener at 1:05 p.m., with a banner hanging above the scoreboard all spring and a video tribute and moment of silence before the game.

That will carry over until Opening Day in Baltimore, when the team will honor him with banner on the B&O Warehouse, and a video tribute and moment of silence ahead of the home opener April 4 against the New York Yankees. The Orioles also said there will be a public celebration of life at Camden Yards in April.

Robinson, a trailblazer on and off the field as the first player to win the MVP award in each league and the first African-American manager in major league history, died in California at age 83.

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