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Chris Davis' most memorable moments with the Baltimore |...

Davis homered in six straight games down the stretch of the 2012 season to help the Orioles secure their first playoff birth since 1997. He built off that by homering in the first four contests of 2013, becoming the fourth player in MLB history to do so. Davis tied an AL record with 37 home runs before the All-Star break and was the league’s starting first baseman in the All-Star Game. He also participated in the Home Run Derby, though a blister issue hampered his chances. He ended the year with 53 home runs, an Orioles record, as he finished third in AL Most Valuable Player voting.
(/ AP)

Chris Davis' most memorable moments with the Baltimore Orioles | PHOTOS

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Chris Davis, the two-time home run king who struggled in the latter half of his decade-long run with the Orioles, retired Thursday, abruptly ending the 35-year-old’s up-then-down tenure in Baltimore. Here’s a look back at some of the top moments from the slugger’s decade as an Oriole.
(Nathan Ruiz)
Getting the rally started
Davis arrived at the 2011 trade deadline, coming along with Tommy Hunter from the Texas Rangers for Koji Uehara. Davis, 25 at the time, homered for his first hit with the franchise and played in 31 games as the Orioles finished off their 14th straight losing season. But Davis came up with two outs in the bottom of the ninth Sept. 28, 2011, with the Orioles trailing the Boston Red Sox by one in the bottom of the ninth of the season’s final game. He doubled on the first pitch he saw from Boston closer Jonathan Papelbon, then scored the tying run on Nolan Reimold’s double. Robert Andino played hero with a walk-off single that eliminated the Red Sox from playoff contention and presented a spark for the Orioles’ eventual turnaround, but it was Davis who got the rally started.
Davis arrived at the 2011 trade deadline, coming along with Tommy Hunter from the Texas Rangers for Koji Uehara. Davis, 25 at the time, homered for his first hit with the franchise and played in 31 games as the Orioles finished off their 14th straight losing season. But Davis came up with two outs in the bottom of the ninth Sept. 28, 2011, with the Orioles trailing the Boston Red Sox by one in the bottom of the ninth of the season’s final game. He doubled on the first pitch he saw from Boston closer Jonathan Papelbon, then scored the tying run on Nolan Reimold’s double. Robert Andino played hero with a walk-off single that eliminated the Red Sox from playoff contention and presented a spark for the Orioles’ eventual turnaround, but it was Davis who got the rally started. (Gene Sweeney Jr., Baltimore Sun)
History on the mound
The Orioles and Red Sox had played 15 1/2 innings May 6, 2012, when manager Buck Showalter dropped the designated hitter and sent Davis to the mound for the bottom of the 16th. Davis hadn’t pitched since he was in junior college, but he was open to the move after going hitless and striking out five times as a batter. “I’m like, sweet,” Davis said then. “I get to try something different today because hitting ain’t working.” Davis opened his outing with a strikeout and got a flyball for the second out, then an error and double seemed as if it would end the game, but a relay from Adam Jones to J.J. Hardy to Matt Wieters ended the inning. Jones hit a three-run home run in the top of the 17th off outfielder Darnell McDonald, and Davis got a double play to end the game in the bottom half, becoming the first player to go 0-for-8 as a hitter and get a win as a pitcher since 1905.
The Orioles and Red Sox had played 15 1/2 innings May 6, 2012, when manager Buck Showalter dropped the designated hitter and sent Davis to the mound for the bottom of the 16th. Davis hadn’t pitched since he was in junior college, but he was open to the move after going hitless and striking out five times as a batter. “I’m like, sweet,” Davis said then. “I get to try something different today because hitting ain’t working.” Davis opened his outing with a strikeout and got a flyball for the second out, then an error and double seemed as if it would end the game, but a relay from Adam Jones to J.J. Hardy to Matt Wieters ended the inning. Jones hit a three-run home run in the top of the 17th off outfielder Darnell McDonald, and Davis got a double play to end the game in the bottom half, becoming the first player to go 0-for-8 as a hitter and get a win as a pitcher since 1905. (US Presswire)
MVP candidate
Davis homered in six straight games down the stretch of the 2012 season to help the Orioles secure their first playoff birth since 1997. He built off that by homering in the first four contests of 2013, becoming the fourth player in MLB history to do so. Davis tied an AL record with 37 home runs before the All-Star break and was the league’s starting first baseman in the All-Star Game. He also participated in the Home Run Derby, though a blister issue hampered his chances. He ended the year with 53 home runs, an Orioles record, as he finished third in AL Most Valuable Player voting.
Davis homered in six straight games down the stretch of the 2012 season to help the Orioles secure their first playoff birth since 1997. He built off that by homering in the first four contests of 2013, becoming the fourth player in MLB history to do so. Davis tied an AL record with 37 home runs before the All-Star break and was the league’s starting first baseman in the All-Star Game. He also participated in the Home Run Derby, though a blister issue hampered his chances. He ended the year with 53 home runs, an Orioles record, as he finished third in AL Most Valuable Player voting. (/ AP)
Big contract
In 2014, Davis hit 26 home runs, including a pinch-hit, three-run, walk-off shot to come back against the Chicago White Sox on June 23 of that season. Davis again led the sport with 47 home runs in 2015, becoming a free agent having averaged nearly 40 runs a year over four full seasons in Baltimore. With the Orioles having lost popular outfielders Nick Markakis and Nelson Cruz the previous offseason, retaining Davis became a priority, and they shelled out the largest contract in franchise history to do so, signing Davis to a seven-year, $161 million contract that included $42 million in deferred payments that go through 2037. Davis hit 38 home runs in the first year of the deal, but that figure declined each season afterward. Thursday’s retirement means he hit .196/.291/.379 with 92 home runs during the contract.
In 2014, Davis hit 26 home runs, including a pinch-hit, three-run, walk-off shot to come back against the Chicago White Sox on June 23 of that season. Davis again led the sport with 47 home runs in 2015, becoming a free agent having averaged nearly 40 runs a year over four full seasons in Baltimore. With the Orioles having lost popular outfielders Nick Markakis and Nelson Cruz the previous offseason, retaining Davis became a priority, and they shelled out the largest contract in franchise history to do so, signing Davis to a seven-year, $161 million contract that included $42 million in deferred payments that go through 2037. Davis hit 38 home runs in the first year of the deal, but that figure declined each season afterward. Thursday’s retirement means he hit .196/.291/.379 with 92 home runs during the contract. (©Kevin Richardson / Baltimore Sun)
Breaking the streak
Combined with the finish to his rough 2018 season, Davis’ slow start to 2019 gave him a major league record for consecutive hitless at-bats and plate appearances. He finally snapped both droughts with a two-run single amid a three-hit day against the Red Sox on April 13, 2019. “It meant a lot to me,” Davis said. Earlier in the day, Davis had received a letter from young Red Sox fan Henry Frasca telling him that no matter how he performed on the field, it didn’t affect the type of person he is. When the Orioles returned to Fenway Park in August, Davis welcomed Frasca to shag fly balls during batting practice.
Combined with the finish to his rough 2018 season, Davis’ slow start to 2019 gave him a major league record for consecutive hitless at-bats and plate appearances. He finally snapped both droughts with a two-run single amid a three-hit day against the Red Sox on April 13, 2019. “It meant a lot to me,” Davis said. Earlier in the day, Davis had received a letter from young Red Sox fan Henry Frasca telling him that no matter how he performed on the field, it didn’t affect the type of person he is. When the Orioles returned to Fenway Park in August, Davis welcomed Frasca to shag fly balls during batting practice.
One last moment with fans at Camden Yards
In what turned out to be his final game in front of fans at Camden Yards, Davis delivered one last signature moment on Sept. 22, 2019. In the seventh inning of a tie game, Davis hit a go-ahead home run to give the Orioles a victory in their home finale against the Seattle Mariners. He said afterward that moment caused him to reflect on his final home game in 2015, when he thought he could be leaving as a free agent. “I remembered [in 2015] right before I crossed home plate looking into the stands thinking, ‘Is this the last time I’m going to be doing this?’ " Davis said. “Today was kind of a similar thing, but I know it’s not the last time I’m going to do it.” It turned out to be. He homered once on the Orioles’ final road trip of that season, giving him 253 with the Baltimore, the sixth-most in franchise history. He went homerless in the 2020 season, missing most of the year with injuries as fans weren’t allowed in ballparks because of the coronavirus pandemic. Davis’ 140 home runs at Oriole Park trail only Jones’ 146.
In what turned out to be his final game in front of fans at Camden Yards, Davis delivered one last signature moment on Sept. 22, 2019. In the seventh inning of a tie game, Davis hit a go-ahead home run to give the Orioles a victory in their home finale against the Seattle Mariners. He said afterward that moment caused him to reflect on his final home game in 2015, when he thought he could be leaving as a free agent. “I remembered [in 2015] right before I crossed home plate looking into the stands thinking, ‘Is this the last time I’m going to be doing this?’ " Davis said. “Today was kind of a similar thing, but I know it’s not the last time I’m going to do it.” It turned out to be. He homered once on the Orioles’ final road trip of that season, giving him 253 with the Baltimore, the sixth-most in franchise history. He went homerless in the 2020 season, missing most of the year with injuries as fans weren’t allowed in ballparks because of the coronavirus pandemic. Davis’ 140 home runs at Oriole Park trail only Jones’ 146. (Gail Burton/AP)
Donation to UMMC
For all Davis did on the baseball field, his most lasting impact in Baltimore will come off it. In 2019, Davis was named the Orioles’ nominee for the Roberto Clemente Award for the third straight season thanks to the humanitarian efforts of he and his wife, Jill, in Baltimore. That offseason, they made their largest gift, donating $3 million to the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital, the largest donation the hospital had received from a Baltimore sports figure. The funds went toward the Evelyn Kay Davis Congenital Hybrid Catheterization Suite, named after the Davises’ daughter, Evie, who was born with a ventricular septal defect in January 2018. “We wanted to do something big,” Jill said. “Here,” Davis added.
For all Davis did on the baseball field, his most lasting impact in Baltimore will come off it. In 2019, Davis was named the Orioles’ nominee for the Roberto Clemente Award for the third straight season thanks to the humanitarian efforts of he and his wife, Jill, in Baltimore. That offseason, they made their largest gift, donating $3 million to the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital, the largest donation the hospital had received from a Baltimore sports figure. The funds went toward the Evelyn Kay Davis Congenital Hybrid Catheterization Suite, named after the Davises’ daughter, Evie, who was born with a ventricular septal defect in January 2018. “We wanted to do something big,” Jill said. “Here,” Davis added. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)
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