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After a fake by Tavon Austin (Dunbar), Stedman Bailey of the Rams returns a punt 90 yards for a touchdown against Seattle.
After a fake by Tavon Austin (Dunbar), Stedman Bailey of the Rams returns a punt 90 yards for a touchdown against Seattle. (Bettina Hansen / MCT)

Ravens special teams coordinator Jerry Rosburg said he knows some indicators that could help the Ravens from giving up a big play on a trick punt return, as the Seattle Seahawks did in a loss to the St. Louis Rams on Sunday.

The Seahawks coverage team ran to the sideline to surround returner and Baltimore native Tavon Austin, but Austin was bluffing. With all of the attention on the wrong side of the field, teammate Stedman Bailey fielded the punt near the other sideline and returned it almost unbothered for a touchdown.

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"You've seen it [on tape], you prepare for it, but until you see it in person, you have to figure out, 'How are we going to stop that play?' " Rosburg said. "There's a couple of clues, which I'll keep to myself, but I think it really speaks to the caliber of the players and the coaches in this league and the team that had it against them. They were doing everything right. They were chasing a very talented returner. Most everybody would be. I just give my hats off to St. Louis; it was a good play."

Rosburg had a twinkle in his eye as he recalled the play's first NFL exposure, run by the Chicago Bears in 2011. Like the Rams' Austin, the Bears had a feared returner in Devin Hester that year.

"That was also successful, and if you recall the play, there unfortunately was a foul — a ghost foul, in my opinion, but we won't get into that," Rosburg said. "Chicago executed. It was almost the same part of the field, it was the same side of the field, and they had the same kind of returner, Devin Hester, who ran over there, and everybody goes over where Devin Hester is."

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