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Ravens fullback Kyle Juszczyk concentrating on ball security after lost fumble

Ravens fullback Kyle Juszczyk has fumbled twice this season, including once on Sunday.
Ravens fullback Kyle Juszczyk has fumbled twice this season, including once on Sunday. (Mitch Stringer / USA Today Sports)

Ravens fullback Kyle Juszczyk was visibly angry at himself Sunday when he didn't tuck the football in following a catch and paid the price with his second lost fumble of the season.

The turnover led to a 53-yard field goal for Jacksonville Jaguars kicker Josh Scobee during the second quarter of the Ravens' 20-12 win.

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The former Harvard standout is known for his sound hands and had never fumbled at any level of football until earlier this season when he lost control of the ball against the New Orleans Saints.

Against the Jaguars, the fumble ruling was upheld following the Ravens' unsuccessful instant replay challenge.

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"You've got to have better ball security and know the down and distance and where you're at on the field," Juszczyk said. "It's more annoying than anything. Hopefully, that's the last one."

Juszczyk has drawn high marks for his work as a lead blocker for Justin Forsett, who has rushed for 1,128 yards and eight touchdowns.

Juszczyk has also caught 19 passes for 182 yards and a touchdown. But fumbling will likely cut down on his opportunities to touch the football.

"Basically, the coaches told me to play smart," Juszczyk said.

Ravens coach John Harbaugh made it a point that the team can't afford to have turnovers. The Ravens rank 13th in the NFL in turnover margin, plus-2, with 19 takeaways and 17 turnovers on nine interceptions and eight lost fumbles.

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"All I ever think about usually are the ones that we gave away and thinking that we shouldn't have given them away," Harbaugh said. "But that's the key in the games that we lost there, that would've made a difference for us. It ended up being the difference.

"Going forward, it just has to be something that we do better than anybody else. It's something that we talk about all the time. We emphasize it in practice and it has to be the main thing."

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