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Orioles notes: Trey Mancini's power surge rubbing off on Orioles' teammates -- by using his bats

Baltimore Orioles got four home runs on 15 hits off Blue Jays pitching for the 11-4 win. The Orioles have the best record in baseball at 8-3. (Kevin Richardson / Baltimore Sun video)

TORONTO — It might not be an ending out of "The Natural," but the aura surrounding Trey Mancini's bat supply after the Orioles' 11-4 win over the Blue Jays was worthy of a Hollywood script.

Mancini had his second two-homer game in three games, and his seven career homers are tied for the most by any player through his first 12 major league games. Colorado's Trevor Story did it last season and Pittsburgh's Dino Restelli in 1949.

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After Mancini hit his second homer Sunday, a mammoth solo home run to the deepest part of The Rogers Centre that landed in the center field batter's eye area, his Orioles teammates wanted a part of Mancini's home run mojo.

Later in that five-run eighth inning, left fielder Craig Gentry borrowed one of Mancini's bats – he uses a Louisville Slugger C243 model -- then hit a two-run homer to left. And two batters later, third baseman Manny Machado did the same and launched an opposite-field, two-run homer off the right-field foul pole netting.

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"It must be Wonderboy," Orioles manager Buck Showalter said, making reference to Roy Hobbs' mythical bat in "The Natural." "I've never seen that before. When you're ahead like that you're trying to be respectful of the opposition and not try to have too much fun, but that was one where I just went, ' Really?' When the third one went and it hit the foul pole or the foul flag or whatever, [I though], 'You kidding me? Come on.' "

Consider that Gentry and Machado were dealing with slumps before swinging Mancini's bat, Mancini joked that he might need to resupply his bat bag soon. Machado was in a 2-for-24 over his last seven games before hitting the home run, and Gentry had his first hit of the season earlier in the game after opening the season hitless in his first 13 at-bats. Gentry's homer was his first in the majors since Aug. 1, 2013.

"It was pretty awesome," Mancini said.  "They used the same model, it wasn't the same bat I used [in the game] but they used one of my extra bats. It was pretty cool they both hit home runs. Might need an extra shipment here soon."

As for Mancini, he is making major contributions despite playing part-time with the Orioles, mostly against left-handed starters. He moved to the outfield in spring training, but on Sunday received his first start this season at his natural position of first base. Showalter wanted to give Chris Davis a day off from defense.

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Mancini's first homer of the afternoon -- a three-run blast that landed in the Rogers Centre's second deck in left field and traveled an estimated 404 feet -- gave the Orioles' offense a spark, fueling a five-run sixth inning.

"I'm seeing the ball pretty well," Mancini said. "I'm trying my best…all I'm really focusing on is relaxing and moving back in my load like early and slowly. That is pretty much the only thing I'm thinking of. Luckily everything else is taking care of itself. I know through the year there are going to have to be adjustments that I make. Just feeling very relaxed at the plate more than anything."

Before hitting two homers on Sunday, he also slugged two homers on Wednesday in Boston, and had been a big part of an Orioles offense that has hit four or more homers in three of their last five games.

"That's kind of how it is in baseball," Mancini said. "You can go through little ruts as a team where you might not hit any home runs in a couple games, or you could go through some when you hit five three games in a row. Baseball is a crazy game, so you go to the field and you never know what could happen. It always will surprise you."

Jones hurt crashing into wall, stays in game: Orioles center fielder Adam Jones crashed into an unpadded part of the right-center field wall while chasing a ball in a 10-run game in the eighth, but he remained in the game.

Justin Smoak hit a ball into the gap just out of Jones' reach. The ball hit off Jones' glove for a triple, but Jones ran full stride into a portion of the wall that has a scoreboard on it.

"He knocked the breath out of him more than anything and when I got out there, he was more mad he didn't catch the ball," Showalter said. "He said, "I should have caught it.' "

Jones fell to the ground writing in pain on the warning track, and head trainer Richie Bancells and Showalter ran out to check on him. Despite being on the ground for several moments, Jones slowly got back to his feet and stayed in the game. He was replaced for the final inning.

"I think Adam is playing a little deeper on some situations this year and then the momentum built up there," Showalter said. "They've done a good job over the years – with the exception of two or three parks, you know which ones I'm talking about – they've given some give to the fences. But he and [Kevin] Pillar, those are two as good of centerfielders as there are and regardless of the score, that's how they play."

Around the horn: The Orioles have held opponents to two runs or fewer five times this season, all five of those games coming against Toronto. … The Orioles' upcoming three-game series in Cincinnati will mark their only games outside the AL East in their first 27 games. … Orioles pitchers continued to take batting practice to prepare for their first interleague series in a NL park this week in Cincinnati.

eencina@baltsun.com
twitter.com/EddieInTheYard

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