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Let's get it started: Logistics day for Orioles

A young Baltimore Orioles fan plays with a oversized Orioles bobblehead during a spring training game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Ed Smith Stadium.
A young Baltimore Orioles fan plays with a oversized Orioles bobblehead during a spring training game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Ed Smith Stadium. (Derick Hingle, USA TODAY Sports)

Orioles players officially must report to the Ed Smith Stadium spring training complex on Thursday, but many are already here and some have already begun working out at the facility.

The camp, however, is closed to the media today while Orioles personnel prepare it for what is a fairly complicated first couple days of workouts and physicals. The arriving players go through a fairly rigorous medical examination after they report, and not just to see if they are able to begin throwing, catching and running.

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The physicals cover just about everything from head to toe. They have gradually been expanded over the years to deal with almost any physical issue to avoid anything like the sad moment 20 years ago when the late Twins Hall of Famer Kirby Puckett lost sight because of undetected glaucoma.

This is also the time when manager Buck Showalter and his coaches hunker down and design the team's spring training routine, though it probably doesn't change all that much from year to year. Showalter has been doing this awhile, but he does adjust his workout schedule and adds new points of emphasis each spring, depending on the makeup of the roster.

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The first pitcher/catcher workout is Friday and it kicks off a short segment of the non-competitive training period that the club hopes will be boring and uneventful.

Still waiting to see signs of progress in the ongoing negotiations with pitcher Yovani Gallardo.

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