Baseball Hall of Famer, retired Baltimore Orioles infielder Cal Ripken Jr., speaks during a news conference to discuss the 20th anniversary of his 2,131st consecutive game at Camden Yards.
Baseball Hall of Famer, retired Baltimore Orioles infielder Cal Ripken Jr., speaks during a news conference to discuss the 20th anniversary of his 2,131st consecutive game at Camden Yards. (Karl Merton Ferron / Baltimore Sun)

As a guest on the Rich Eisen Show on Friday, Cal Ripken Jr. faced another round of questions regarding the Washington Nationals' managerial opening.

Has the 55-year-old Ripken received a call from the Nats yet? No, he told Eisen.

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Would Ripken answer if they called? "Sure. Sure, I'd answer," he said.

Does he want his phone to ring with Nats general manager Mike Rizzo on the other end? "Yeah, everybody wants a phone call like that," Ripken said.

Now, does Ripken want to be the next Nats manager?

"Hmm. I said I'd answer the phone," Ripken said laughing. "And I'd like to ask some questions myself."

However, the Orioles legend and Baseball Hall of Famer did express that he has something to bring to a managerial position.

"Certainly the baseball background that I have, you're a student of the game -- there's a lot said about experience or lack of experience in managers coming through," Ripken said. "To me, it's all about your philosophy, how you handle things, what you're going to do. And then, it's being able to apply it. And so, I haven't had a chance to apply that, so no one knows.

"So that would be a risk, I suppose. But I'm in the business world now and all the time, it seems like I'm asking for experts to come around and tell me what to do because I don't have that background to fall back on. But in baseball, I have that background to fall back on and I would know how to deal with whatever situations there because I've seen it."

After the Nats fired Matt Williams on Monday, Baltimore Sun columnist Peter Schmuck detailed why Ripken is unlikely to be a candidate for the job.

Rizzo clearly stated that he won't likely be hiring another first-time major league manager as Williams' successor.

"Experience is always helpful," Rizzo said on a conference call with reporters. "It always adds a layer of expertise to anybody's resume. We feel that where we're at in our timetable of winning a championship, we certainly would lean toward someone that has some type of managerial experience, especially at the major league level."

That hasn't stopped Ripken from weighing in when asked.

During Friday's interview with Eisen, Ripken was also asked about the Bryce Harper-Jonathan Papelbon fight, and said the incident might not indicate that the situation in Washington's clubhouse is untenable.

"You can overblow that. I've been in clubhouses and I've seen those sorts of things happen and it's how they handle [it]. And really, it's understanding how they got to that point," Ripken said. "Maybe it could've been prevented, but everybody has to get over those sorts of things.

"It's a competitive, high-pressure environment, and when things go bad -- and the Nationals, things didn't really go bad. Going bad is starting a season 0-6, getting your dad fired, losing 15 more and now everyone in the country's laughing at you because you're so bad, losing 100 games again. If you keep perspective for a minute, they're not that far off right now."

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