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Daniel Romanchuk of Mount Airy poses for photos as the winner of the pro wheelchair men's division of the New York City Marathon in New York's Central Park on Sunday, Nov. 3, 2019.
Daniel Romanchuk of Mount Airy poses for photos as the winner of the pro wheelchair men's division of the New York City Marathon in New York's Central Park on Sunday, Nov. 3, 2019. (Richard Drew/AP)

Daniel Romanchuk of the United States repeated as the New York City Marathon men’s wheelchair champion Sunday in another tight finish over Switzerland’s Marcel Hug.

Romanchuk, 21, who grew up in Mount Airy and now lives in Illinois, held off Hug by 1 second for the second straight year, crossing the finish line in 1 hour, 37 minutes and 24 seconds. England’s David Weir and American Aaron Pike were also within 10 seconds.

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Last year, Romanchuk became the first American and youngest competitor to win the men’s division as a 20-year-old. He followed with victories this year at the Boston and London marathons. Hug took the New York title in 2016 and 2017.

Born with spina bifida, a spinal cord defect, Romanchuk began taking part in adaptive sports through Kennedy Krieger Institute’s Bennett Blazers in Baltimore at the age of 2. Four years ago, he and his mother Kim moved to Champaign, Ill., so that he could learn from former Paralympian and University of Illinois wheelchair racing coach Adam Bleakney.

Romanchuk, who has already qualified for the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, will travel to Dubai for the World Para Athletics Championships, beginning on Nov. 7.

Manuela Schar of Switzerland has won her third straight women’s wheelchair title at the New York City Marathon, giving her eight consecutive marathon major victories.

After rolling ahead of the record pace for much of Sunday’s race, Schar crossed the finish about a minute off the mark at 1:44:20. Clarksville resident Tatyana McFadden (Atholton) finished second in 1:48:19. McFadden won the NYC Marathon four straight years before Schar beat her in 2017.

Both Romanchuk and Schar collected $25,000, a fivefold increase from last year, according to The New York Times. The New York City Marathon increased the winning purse for the wheelchair winners to $155,000, up from $125,000 last year and now the most of any of the six major marathons.

Men’s college soccer: Michigan (9-4-4, 4-1-3 Big Ten) scored two goals early in the second half to come back from a 2-1 deficit and defeat No. 17 Maryland, 4-2, at Ludwig Field. Maryland got its goals in the first half from junior Eric Matzelevich and senior Eli Crognale. The Terps (9-6-2, 3-2-2) head to the Big Ten Tournament quarterfinals as the No. 5 seed where they will face fourth-seeded Northwestern in Evanston next Sunday.

Women’s college soccer: Mount St. Mary’s lost at Fairleigh Dickinson (8-5-6, 7-0-3 Northeast Conference), 4-1, in the final game of the regular season for the Mountaineers (3-13-1, 2-7-1). Elisabeth Rockhill scored for the Mount while goalkeeper Maggie Barron made a season-high 17 saves.

Horse racing: Laurel Park will host 15 stakes worth $1.45 million in purses on four Saturdays over the duration of the calendar year-ending fall meet, starting with the $100,000 James F. Lewis III for 2-year-olds and $100,000 Smart Halo for 2-year-old fillies Nov. 16. Four $100,000 stakes are scheduled for Nov. 30 – the 1 1/8-mile Richard W. Small and 1 1/16-mile Thirty Eight Go Go for 3-year-olds and up and seven-furlong City of Laurel and Safely Kept for 3-year-olds, the latter for fillies. Maryland-bred/sired horses are featured on Dec. 7 in the $100,000 Maryland Juvenile Futurity for 2-year-olds, $100,000 Maryland Juvenile Filly Championship, $75,000 Politely and $75,000 Howard and Sondra Bender Memorial. Laurel closes the 2019 stakes season with five $100,000 events on Dec. 28 – the Heft for 2-year-olds and Gin Talking for 2-year-old fillies, and the Dave’s Friend and Willa On the Move, each at six furlongs, and 1 1/8-mile Native Dancer for 3-year-olds and up.

The Associated Press contributed to this article.

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