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Denver Nuggets president of basketball operations Tim Connelly makes a point during a news conference Tuesday, May 21, 2019, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Denver Nuggets president of basketball operations Tim Connelly makes a point during a news conference Tuesday, May 21, 2019, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski) (David Zalubowski / AP)

The prospects of a return home to Washington were undeniably appealing to Tim Connelly.

Not nearly as alluring as this: Finishing what he's started.

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The Denver Nuggets president of basketball operations elected to stay in town even with the Washington Wizards calling. Things are booming these days with a Nuggets team that boasts a young nucleus led by big man Nikola Jokic and that won 54 games in the regular season. They were the No. 2 seed in the West before losing to the Portland Trail Blazers in Game 7 at home during the second round of the playoffs.

There was just too much work left to be done in Denver to consider taking Washington's front office job even if it would've been with the organization where Connelly got his start and in the area where he and his wife are from.

From coaching staff to front office to on the court, Denver Nuggets have deep ties to Baltimore

Shooting guard Will Barton is one of a few members of the Denver Nuggets' roster, coaching staff and front office with roots in Baltimore.

“It's safe to assume, and maybe it's me being overly optimistic, that we're going to see a better version of us next year,” Connelly said Tuesday. “I don't know if that means more wins. I don't know if we're going to win a playoff series and advance, but I don't think there's any reason to think there will be any regression next season.”

A Baltimore native, Connelly appreciated the audience with Wizards owner Ted Leonsis. He said he was flattered by their recent “exchange of ideas” as the Wizards look to fill the role of team president after Ernie Grunfeld was fired in April.

“The relationships that have been built up here and the hard times we've been through — it was very hard to envision leaving something that has been so hard and so long coming in its build,” said Connelly, who broke into the NBA with the Wizards as an intern in the basketball operations department, then as an assistant video coordinator and as a scout.

Connelly, a 1994 graduate of Towson Catholic High, was hired as Denver's general manager in July 2013 and it took a while for the team to take off. Team president Josh Kroenke stayed patient with him. Connelly brought in coach Michael Malone, who played four years at Loyola Maryland (1989 to 1993) and began his coaching career at the Friends School, before the 2015-16 season and they've steadily progressed since — from 33 wins in Malone's first year to 40 wins in ‘16-17 to 46 in ‘17-18 and finally to 54 this season, including a league-leading 34-7 home mark.

“We did not get off to a good start by any stretch, and [Kroenke] doubled down on what easily could have been perceived as an initial mistake because he liked the processes and liked how we attacked our job day to day,” said Connelly, who was promoted to president of basketball operations in 2017. “Loyalty and patience is such a rarity in professional sports and that's here in spades. So those things matter to me.”

NBA family tree from Baltimore's Connelly brothers is growing

Brothers Tim Connelly (Denver Nuggets), Pat Connelly (Phoenix Suns), Joe Connelly (Washington Wizards) and Dan Connelly (Utah Jazz) grew up in Baltimore's Roland Park neighborhood and now work for NBA franchises.

Connelly and his staff have struck it rich in the draft, taking Jokic with the 41st pick of the second round in 2014. They've also selected Jamal Murray, along with up-and-comers Juancho Hernangomez, Malik Beasley and Michael Porter Jr., who sat out this season as he recovered from back surgery.

The biggest offseason decision remains this: What to do with veteran leader Paul Millsap. The team holds a $30 million option, which could be restructured.

“I fully expect Paul to be back in a Nuggets uniform,” Connelly said.

On the free agency front, Denver hasn't exactly been an attractive landing spot in recent summers. But Connelly sees that starting to change and believes the unselfish play of Jokic could be an enticing selling point. Denver could be in the market for another shooter and a power forward in order to take the next step.

“It will be fascinating to make those calls” in free agency, Connelly said. “If they say it's about winning and the answer is about winning and they don't talk to us, then I think it's a disingenuous answer.”

The Nuggets definitely turned some heads throughout the regular season as they challenged Golden State down to the wire for the best mark in the West. They beat San Antonio in seven games in the first round before falling to the Trail Blazers.

“We sent a pretty loud message,” Malone said. “I think there were questions about our team all year long, for whatever reason: How legitimate are they? Are they really a No. 2 seed? Can they take their game into the playoffs with so many young guys that've never been there before?

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“We answered so many questions about our team in the best way possible.”

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