xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">

15 most recent No. 5 MLB draft picks | PHOTOS

Hobgood never made it to the big leagues. A prep right-hander out of Norco, California, Hobgood pitched six seasons in the Orioles' minor league system and never found his footing, totaling a 4.98 ERA with a 17-24 record in 110 games pitched between Rookie-level ball and Double-A Bowie. His final season of pro baseball game in 2015, when Hobgood went 1-1 with a 6.52 ERA in six games and just 9.2 innings pitched at Bowie.
(Baltimore Sun photo by Karl Merton Ferron)
Advertisement
Advertisement
The Orioles have the No. 5 pick in the 2021 MLB draft Sunday. Take a look at the past 15 players taken with the fifth pick, from 2006 through 2020.
(Tim Schwartz)
2006: Brandon Morrow, Seattle Mariners
Morrow was selected out of Cal-Berkeley and appeared in 334 games with 113 starts and owns a career record of 51-43 with a 3.96 ERA. He pitched 859 career innings and struck out 877 batters and was worth 11.2 wins above replacement. Morrow, who pitched for Seattle, Toronto, San Diego, the Dodgers and Cubs, also notched 40 saves in his 12-year career. He last appeared in a major league game in 2018, when he had 22 saves and pitched in 35 games.
Morrow was selected out of Cal-Berkeley and appeared in 334 games with 113 starts and owns a career record of 51-43 with a 3.96 ERA. He pitched 859 career innings and struck out 877 batters and was worth 11.2 wins above replacement. Morrow, who pitched for Seattle, Toronto, San Diego, the Dodgers and Cubs, also notched 40 saves in his 12-year career. He last appeared in a major league game in 2018, when he had 22 saves and pitched in 35 games. (/ AP)
2007: Matt Wieters, Orioles
Out of Georgia Tech, Wieters was projected to be "Mauer with power," and while he had numerous successful seasons with the O's, he didn't necessarily live up to the incredible hype. The four-time All-Star and two-time Gold Glove winner has totaled 996 hits and 146 home runs to go with his .249 batting average in 1,167 games played. The 35-year-old debuted as a 23-year-old in Baltimore and played eight seasons there before playing two years in Washington and two in St. Louis. Wieters, who was recently dropped from the Olympic roster, is a free agent.
Out of Georgia Tech, Wieters was projected to be "Mauer with power," and while he had numerous successful seasons with the O's, he didn't necessarily live up to the incredible hype. The four-time All-Star and two-time Gold Glove winner has totaled 996 hits and 146 home runs to go with his .249 batting average in 1,167 games played. The 35-year-old debuted as a 23-year-old in Baltimore and played eight seasons there before playing two years in Washington and two in St. Louis. Wieters, who was recently dropped from the Olympic roster, is a free agent. (Associated Press file photo)
2008: Buster Posey, San Fransisco Giants
Posey is without question the best No. 5 draft pick in the past 15 years. The 34-year-old out of Florida State is a seven-time All-Star, is a three-time World Series champion and was the 2012 NL MVP. His 43.7 wins above replacement are among the best all-time for a No. 5 overall pick. The catcher owns a career batting average of .303 to go with 701 RBIs and a .832 OPS — not to mention his defensive prowess; he won the 2016 NL Gold Glove — in his 12-year major league career.
Posey is without question the best No. 5 draft pick in the past 15 years. The 34-year-old out of Florida State is a seven-time All-Star, is a three-time World Series champion and was the 2012 NL MVP. His 43.7 wins above replacement are among the best all-time for a No. 5 overall pick. The catcher owns a career batting average of .303 to go with 701 RBIs and a .832 OPS — not to mention his defensive prowess; he won the 2016 NL Gold Glove — in his 12-year major league career. (Jeff Chiu/AP)
2009: Matt Hobgood, Orioles
Hobgood never made it to the big leagues. A prep right-hander out of Norco, California, Hobgood pitched six seasons in the Orioles' minor league system and never found his footing, totaling a 4.98 ERA with a 17-24 record in 110 games pitched between Rookie-level ball and Double-A Bowie. His final season of pro baseball game in 2015, when Hobgood went 1-1 with a 6.52 ERA in six games and just 9.2 innings pitched at Bowie.
Hobgood never made it to the big leagues. A prep right-hander out of Norco, California, Hobgood pitched six seasons in the Orioles' minor league system and never found his footing, totaling a 4.98 ERA with a 17-24 record in 110 games pitched between Rookie-level ball and Double-A Bowie. His final season of pro baseball game in 2015, when Hobgood went 1-1 with a 6.52 ERA in six games and just 9.2 innings pitched at Bowie. (Baltimore Sun photo by Karl Merton Ferron)
2010: Drew Pomeranz, Cleveland Indians
Pomeranz has turned in a stellar career as a left-handed reliever as of late, as he currently pitches in the late innings for the San Diego Padres. The Ole Miss product was traded by Cleveland to Colorado 13 months after being drafted as part of the Ubaldo Jimenez trade, and the crafty left-hander pitched three seasons for the Rockies before going to Oakland and eventually to San Diego, where he developed into an All-Star before being dealt again to the Red Sox at the 2016 trade deadline and was a key starter. He owns a career 3.93 ERA and a 47-58 record while starting in half of his 280 career games. His 12.4 wins above replacement is the best among pitchers drafted fifth overall since Jack McDowell in 1987.
Pomeranz has turned in a stellar career as a left-handed reliever as of late, as he currently pitches in the late innings for the San Diego Padres. The Ole Miss product was traded by Cleveland to Colorado 13 months after being drafted as part of the Ubaldo Jimenez trade, and the crafty left-hander pitched three seasons for the Rockies before going to Oakland and eventually to San Diego, where he developed into an All-Star before being dealt again to the Red Sox at the 2016 trade deadline and was a key starter. He owns a career 3.93 ERA and a 47-58 record while starting in half of his 280 career games. His 12.4 wins above replacement is the best among pitchers drafted fifth overall since Jack McDowell in 1987. (Ross D. Franklin/AP)
2011: Bubba Starling, Kansas City Royals
Starling played more than seven seasons in the Royals minor league system before finally reaching the big leagues as a 26-year-old in 2019. He appeared in 56 games and batted .215 with four home runs that season and played in 35 while batting just .169 in 2020. The center fielder, who was drafted out of Gardner-Edgerton High School in Kansas, is currently with Triple-A Omaha.
Starling played more than seven seasons in the Royals minor league system before finally reaching the big leagues as a 26-year-old in 2019. He appeared in 56 games and batted .215 with four home runs that season and played in 35 while batting just .169 in 2020. The center fielder, who was drafted out of Gardner-Edgerton High School in Kansas, is currently with Triple-A Omaha. (Charlie Riedel/AP)
2012: Kyle Zimmer, Kansas City Royals
Zimmer, a right-hander out of the University of San Francisco, made his major league debut in March 2019 after spending parts of seven seasons in the minors. He overcame a shoulder surgery that cost him most of 2016 and all of 2017 but managed a 10.80 ERA in 2019. in 15 games. He pitched to a much-improved 1.57 ERA in 16 appearances in 2020 with the Royals and owns a 2.65 ERA in 34 innings pitched in 31 games with two starts for Kansas City this season. Overall, Zimmer owns a 4.30 ERA and a 5-1 record with two saves in 62 big league games.
Zimmer, a right-hander out of the University of San Francisco, made his major league debut in March 2019 after spending parts of seven seasons in the minors. He overcame a shoulder surgery that cost him most of 2016 and all of 2017 but managed a 10.80 ERA in 2019. in 15 games. He pitched to a much-improved 1.57 ERA in 16 appearances in 2020 with the Royals and owns a 2.65 ERA in 34 innings pitched in 31 games with two starts for Kansas City this season. Overall, Zimmer owns a 4.30 ERA and a 5-1 record with two saves in 62 big league games. (Reed Hoffmann/AP)
2013: Clint Frazier, Cleveland Indians
Frazier, then a third baseman, was drafted out of Loganville High in Georgia and was famously part of the 2016 trade that sent Andrew Miller from the Yankees to the Indians. He spent several seasons in the minors before reaching the big leagues with New York as a 22-year-old outfielder in 2017 and was largely between the bigs and Triple-A the next two years. He's been a steady major leaguer since 2019 and owns a career .239 batting average with 21 home runs and 69 RBIs in 228 career games with the Yankees.
Frazier, then a third baseman, was drafted out of Loganville High in Georgia and was famously part of the 2016 trade that sent Andrew Miller from the Yankees to the Indians. He spent several seasons in the minors before reaching the big leagues with New York as a 22-year-old outfielder in 2017 and was largely between the bigs and Triple-A the next two years. He's been a steady major leaguer since 2019 and owns a career .239 batting average with 21 home runs and 69 RBIs in 228 career games with the Yankees. (Elsa/Getty Images)
2014: Nick Gordon, Minnesota Twins
Gordon was taken out of Olympia High in Orlando, Florida, and reached the big leagues for the first time this season. He's played well overall, batting .279 with four extra-base hits in 65 plate appearances across 23 games while playing both infield and outfield spots. He's flashed some speed in all levels, averaging 35 steals per 162 games, and is still just 25 years old. He's been a consistent hitter at all levels as well, and made his major league debut May 6 after getting his first call to the big show April 23.
Gordon was taken out of Olympia High in Orlando, Florida, and reached the big leagues for the first time this season. He's played well overall, batting .279 with four extra-base hits in 65 plate appearances across 23 games while playing both infield and outfield spots. He's flashed some speed in all levels, averaging 35 steals per 162 games, and is still just 25 years old. He's been a consistent hitter at all levels as well, and made his major league debut May 6 after getting his first call to the big show April 23. (Charlie Riedel/AP)
2015: Kyle Tucker, Houston Astros
Tucker has been the most successful hitter among No. 5 overall picks of the 2010s. Taken out of H.B. Plant High in Tampa, Florida, the outfielder made it to the big leagues by the age of 21 but struggled, batting .141 with just nine hits in 64 at-bats in 2018. However, the then-No. 5 overall prospect came back strong in 2019 and hit .269 with an .857 OPS for the World Series-bound Astros, and he's started to show more power of late with nine homers in 2020 and 13 so far this season. The 24-year-old looks to be a mainstay in the Houston lineup for years to come.
Tucker has been the most successful hitter among No. 5 overall picks of the 2010s. Taken out of H.B. Plant High in Tampa, Florida, the outfielder made it to the big leagues by the age of 21 but struggled, batting .141 with just nine hits in 64 at-bats in 2018. However, the then-No. 5 overall prospect came back strong in 2019 and hit .269 with an .857 OPS for the World Series-bound Astros, and he's started to show more power of late with nine homers in 2020 and 13 so far this season. The 24-year-old looks to be a mainstay in the Houston lineup for years to come. (David J. Phillip/AP)
2016: Corey Ray, Milwaukee Brewers
Ray was taken out of Louisville and made his MLB debut April 24 this year, recording a walk, scoring a run, and playing right field in his only appearance. He's largely played the past two seasons in Triple-A, where's shown a mixed bag offensively, but in 2018 Ray was the Southern League Most Valuable Player for the Brewers' Double-A affiliate, the Biloxi Shuckers. He batted .239 with 27 home runs, 74 RBIs and 37 stolen bases that year, though he's hit just 11 homers since in 94 minor league games.
Ray was taken out of Louisville and made his MLB debut April 24 this year, recording a walk, scoring a run, and playing right field in his only appearance. He's largely played the past two seasons in Triple-A, where's shown a mixed bag offensively, but in 2018 Ray was the Southern League Most Valuable Player for the Brewers' Double-A affiliate, the Biloxi Shuckers. He batted .239 with 27 home runs, 74 RBIs and 37 stolen bases that year, though he's hit just 11 homers since in 94 minor league games. (Sue Ogrocki/AP)
2017: Kyle Wright, Atlanta Braves
Wright was immediately one of the game's top prospects after the Braves selected the right-hander out of Vanderbilt. A consistent minor league performer who was among the top 40 prospects in 2018 and 2019, Wright was the first 2017 draftee to reach the majors and pitched in four games in September that season. He earned a spot in the starting rotation in 2019 but struggled before being demoted to Triple-A. In 2020, Wright shined in the postseason, shutting down the Marlins across six scoreless innings in a series-clinching Game 3 victory in the NLDS. The 25-year-old is now at Triple-A Gwinnett after pitching to a 9.95 ERA in two starts for the Braves in 2021.
Wright was immediately one of the game's top prospects after the Braves selected the right-hander out of Vanderbilt. A consistent minor league performer who was among the top 40 prospects in 2018 and 2019, Wright was the first 2017 draftee to reach the majors and pitched in four games in September that season. He earned a spot in the starting rotation in 2019 but struggled before being demoted to Triple-A. In 2020, Wright shined in the postseason, shutting down the Marlins across six scoreless innings in a series-clinching Game 3 victory in the NLDS. The 25-year-old is now at Triple-A Gwinnett after pitching to a 9.95 ERA in two starts for the Braves in 2021. (Noah K. Murray/AP)
2018: Jonathan India, Cincinnati Reds
Taken out of the University of Florida, India made the Reds out of spring training and has stuck around throughout 2021. In 74 games, the transitioned second baseman has shown promise, batting .267 with six home runs and 19 extra-base hits to go with 33 RBIs and a .789 OPS. The 24-year-old hasn't needed much time in the minors, spending 44 games in 2018 playing Rookie-level and A-ball before playing High-A and Double-A in 2019, when he batted .259 with 34 extra-base hits in 121 games.
Taken out of the University of Florida, India made the Reds out of spring training and has stuck around throughout 2021. In 74 games, the transitioned second baseman has shown promise, batting .267 with six home runs and 19 extra-base hits to go with 33 RBIs and a .789 OPS. The 24-year-old hasn't needed much time in the minors, spending 44 games in 2018 playing Rookie-level and A-ball before playing High-A and Double-A in 2019, when he batted .259 with 34 extra-base hits in 121 games. (Aaron Doster/AP)
2019: Riley Greene, Detroit Tigers
Greene is a product out of Paul J. Hagerty High in Oviedo, Florida, who is currently playing for Double-A Erie. The 20-year-old left-handed outfielder is proving why he's the game's No. 15 overall prospect as he's batting .284 with nine home runs and seven doubles to go with an .853 OPS in 50 games. At this rate, expect to see Greene playing for the Tigers at some point in 2022, if not sooner.
Greene is a product out of Paul J. Hagerty High in Oviedo, Florida, who is currently playing for Double-A Erie. The 20-year-old left-handed outfielder is proving why he's the game's No. 15 overall prospect as he's batting .284 with nine home runs and seven doubles to go with an .853 OPS in 50 games. At this rate, expect to see Greene playing for the Tigers at some point in 2022, if not sooner. (Paul Sancya/AP)
2020: Austin Martin, Toronto Blue Jays
Martin was one of the best pure hitters during his college days at Vanderbilt, and the do-it-all infielder and outfielder has continued that trend in the minors. After losing his entire 2020 MiLB season, Martin has picked right up at Double-AA New Hampshire and has batted .268 with 12 extra-base hits with a .777 OPS in 41 games at age 22. He's ranked as the No. 16 overall prospect in the game.
Martin was one of the best pure hitters during his college days at Vanderbilt, and the do-it-all infielder and outfielder has continued that trend in the minors. After losing his entire 2020 MiLB season, Martin has picked right up at Double-AA New Hampshire and has batted .268 with 12 extra-base hits with a .777 OPS in 41 games at age 22. He's ranked as the No. 16 overall prospect in the game. (Nathan Denette/AP)
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement