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Indian Creek to expand practice for fall athletes, possibility of scrimmages in the next few weeks

Indian Creek will expand practices with possibility of scrimmages for fall sports. Pictured are Annapolis Area Christian School's Livy Lenhart, center right, and from left, Indian Creek's Elizabeth Foster, Reagan Bice and Ellie Bear Sharma, in a game from last year.
Indian Creek will expand practices with possibility of scrimmages for fall sports. Pictured are Annapolis Area Christian School's Livy Lenhart, center right, and from left, Indian Creek's Elizabeth Foster, Reagan Bice and Ellie Bear Sharma, in a game from last year. (Joshua McKerrow/Capital Gazette)

Indian Creek will only hold practices for now, with a possibility for a few games against limited schools within the next month, athletic director Tyler Larkin told The Capital.

Instead of a full slate of competition, the Eagles will transition from two days of strength-and-conditioning sessions to allowing its fall athletic teams to practice three days a week while permitting its spring and winter sports to condition on Thursdays. Those practices will be geared towards intrasquad scrimmages.

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“It’s fair to say we won’t be playing five to seven games like some of our counterparts,” Larkin said, “but we are formulating plans to have at least potential competitions.”

Indian Creek will continue conversations with a couple “partner schools,” unnamed as of now, to possibly hold a few scrimmages later this fall on Fridays or Saturdays. The school’s athletics will rely on its administration and medical advisory board to determine whether games would be safe in the next few weeks, with a final deadline of Thanksgiving for fall sports.

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If the Eagles were to hold scrimmages, no spectators would be allowed; masks would be a requirement, and coronavirus symptoms screenings would be required by both participating teams and game officials.

“We’re looking right now to partner with schools [where] we know our protocols are going to be maintained, and theirs will be to keep the kids safe,” Larkin said. “If things become safer, we already started conversations with potential partners to have a fall play day.”

Earlier this month, the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association and Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland voted to allow its member schools to choose its level of athletic involvement, leading to most schools scheduling a variety games to be played over the end of October, November and into early December.

Severn School informed its community a little over a week ago that it would not be holding fall sports this year. Archbishop Spalding held its first varsity contest on Tuesday, while St. Mary’s and Annapolis Area Christian School both affirmed each will hold games this fall, some beginning as early as next week. Anne Arundel County Public Schools began school-sanctioned workouts for its fall teams on Oct. 19, which will out carry over the next four weeks.

Key School is still deliberating on its prospects for fall athletics and is currently holding team workouts.

On Thursday, Indian Creek student-athletes posted a petition calling for the return to competitive play.

Senior three-sport athlete Megan Bunker started the petition, which garnered more than 200 signatures, and said all she wanted was a little competition or more practice time — “anything that gets us closer to normal."

Bunker, who felt inspired to post after speaking with fellow senior athletes and underclassmen who struggled with missing sports as much as her, wrote that she believed Indian Creek students would be up to the task of maintaining safety within the school bubble while holding a shortened limited competitive season.

Bunker, who plays lacrosse in the spring and earned All-County honors earlier this year for basketball, noted that the idea of a bubble is already imperfect, as many Eagles athletes are already partaking in club athletics outside of the school of 525 students.

“We really just wanted to express to the school how important athletics are to us," Bunker said. “The motivation wasn’t to try to change their decision or anything because we’re going to respect it 100 percent they know better; safety is the number one priority.”

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