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Five key player losses for Maryland football

When Maryland returns to action in September, the Terps will be a new-look squad with DJ Durkin taking over and putting his stamp on the program in his first year as coach. But there will also be a number of changes on the field as some program stalwarts move on after graduation or to try their luck at the next level. Here are five players the Terps will miss next season.

Running back Brandon Ross

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Ross closed out the season in style when he ran for 418 yards and six touchdowns in Maryland's final two games. In a loss on his senior day against Indiana, Ross became the first Maryland player to rush for 245 yards and three touchdowns in a game. In the season finale against Rutgers, Ross scored the game-winning touchdown on an 80-yard run late in the fourth quarter. After those performances, Ross finished his career fourth on Maryland's all-time rushing list with 2,543 yards.

Ross finished the season with 958 yards and 10 touchdowns while averaging 6.4 yards per carry.

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Though Ross struggled to assert himself at times this season, he came on strong at the end after running back Wes Brown was suspended indefinitely in mid-November. His graduation leaves a number of depth issues at the position, with freshman Ty Johnson (250 yards, three touchdowns) set to be the only returning running back who saw significant action this season.

Offensive lineman Ryan Doyle

Since he took over a starting role on the offensive line as a sophomore in 2013, Doyle had been a constant presence on the line. He made 35 starts in his career and started every game in his senior season. Doyle will be one of three senior starters, joining center Evan Mulrooney and right guard Andrew Zeller, to move on.

Most importantly, Doyle was the most versatile member of the Maryland offensive line. He started games at left tackle, left guard and right tackle this season, often shifting around during games and plugging holes when other players were lost to injury. With a number of young linemen returning for next season, Maryland will have to search for its jack of all trades to help replace Doyle.

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Defensive back Sean Davis

Davis was a member of Maryland's most experienced defensive unit in the secondary. He was one of two Terps defensive backs to start at least 40 games, joining safety Anthony Nixon. And though he struggled at times in his move from safety to cornerback this season, he came up with one of Maryland's biggest defensive plays of the year when he intercepted Rutgers quarterback Chris Laviano on the Scarlet Knights' first drive of the second half in the season finale.

Davis was a sure tackler who finished second on the team with 88 stops. At 6 feet 1, 202 pounds, Davis has good size in the secondary and had a nose for the football with five forced fumbles.

Kicker Brad Craddock

Craddock's encore after he won the Lou Groza Award last season didn't go quite as planned when his season ended after he dislocated his wrist trying to make a tackle on a kickoff return against Wisconsin on Nov. 7. Before that, he hadn't been used that often and was 8-for-10 on field goals and 22-for-23 on extra points at the time of his injury.

At one point, Craddock went more than a month without attempting a field goal, but he did make three attempts twice in a game this season. Craddock was also lauded for his leadership on the team this season.

Defensive end Yannick Ngakoue

Ngakoue declared for the NFL draft on Nov. 30 after he set Maryland's single-season sack record this fall. Ngakoue had 13 1/2 sacks this season, including a career-high three against Bowling Green in September. Over the course of the season, defensive coordinator Keith Dudzinski talked about Ngakoue's development into a "complete player" in all facets of the game.

Ngakoue finished his career fourth in Maryland history in sacks (21 1/2) and eighth in tackles for loss (33).

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