xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Stevenson football coach Ed Hottle trying to lighten load for RB Trey Lee

Through seven games this season, Stevenson sophomore running back Trey Lee ranks fifth in the Middle Atlantic Conference in carries (123) and yards (660) and third in rushing touchdowns (seven).

That kind of production is what coach Ed Hottle has anticipated, but he acknowledged that he is wary about overextending Lee, especially as the Mustangs (5-2, 4-2) prepare to face No. 12 Widener (7-0, 6-0) on Saturday.

Advertisement

"He was an All-State back," Hottle said Thursday of the Patuxent graduate. "He's a good football player. He's somebody that we expect big things out of, week in and week out. Our biggest thing is, we've got to be careful not to give him the ball too much and not rely on too much of his ability, because he's a special player. We don't want to grind him down too early. But am I surprised by him? Not at all. He's a phenomenal player and can do great things with the football in his hands."

Lee is on pace for 175 carries, 943 yards and 10 touchdowns, all of which would exceed last year's totals of 133 carries, 684 yards and six scores. Hottle said Lee's maturation as a running back has been key.

Advertisement
Advertisement

"I think he's a much more patient runner, and that comes with experience and time," Hottle said. "I think he'll be even better at it this time next year. Obviously, the play of the offensive line has helped the yards and the scores that he's had. I think we've got a lot to improve on in the running game. It's a work in progress, and that's part of our next step to move into the upper echelon of this conference."

Last season, Lee split playing time with junior Marcus Holley, who rushed for more yards (693) and as many touchdowns (six) on fewer attempts (123). But Holley, now a senior who has just 122 yards on 25 carries this fall, has given way to Lee as the team's primary option.

"He's adjusted pretty well," Hottle said of Lee. "We've tried to limit his reps in practice a little bit because he is taking a little bit of a heavier load. We don't beat on him at all in practice. He basically goes through four days of practice without getting touched. He's probably a little [sorer] than he was last year, but he's a tough kid. He's had some tough yards to help us win ballgames late."

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement