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Towson to decide on its starting quarterback later this week

Towson quarterback Connor Frazier.
Towson quarterback Connor Frazier. (Charles LeClaire-USA TODAY Sports)

Connor Frazier made his sixth consecutive start at quarterback in Towson's 62-7 loss to James Madison on Saturday, but he wasn't the only player to line up under center for the Tigers (2-5 overall and 0-3 in the Colonial Athletic Association).

Redshirt senior Joe Brennan directed three series and split a fourth with Frazier, completing 6 of 8 passes for 59 yards and fumbling once that was returned 27 yards for a touchdown in the second quarter.

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Frazier, a junior, led 11 possessions, connected on 17 of 24 throws for 108 yards, had an interception returned 26 yards for a score in the second quarter, and lost a fumble.

That's why coach Rob Ambrose wasn't prepared Monday to declare a starter for the team's game at Delaware (4-2, 2-0) on Saturday.

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"I did like what I saw from Joe, minus the fact that he turned the ball over. I liked some of the stuff I saw from Connor, despite the fact that he turned the ball over," Ambrose said during his weekly conference call organized by the league. "Both guys turned the ball over for touchdowns. We're going to evaluate this as an offensive staff and come up with a plan after that."

The 6-foot, 200-pound Frazier has been the starter all season, but he has struggled to find his touch in the passing game. The 6-3, 208-pound Brennan is considered a more polished passer, but he lacks the mobility that Frazier brings to the field.

Frazier led the offense for the entire second half and directed Towson's lone touchdown drive in the third quarter, but Ambrose conceded that both quarterbacks boast differing strengths.

"If you go through evaluating the season, there were pass plays to be made that have nothing to do with anything other than a physical ability to get the ball to a wide-open receiver, and that's something that Joe has had the ability to do," Ambrose said. "We figured that with Connor could do – and with what Joe couldn't do – was on occasion be able to read the signals and run the right plays. Connor's a good enough athlete to be in the huddle all the time. He's a very good athlete. A good wideout and a good football player. So leaving him in there, that pretty much leaves any room for making mistakes out, that should the play get signaled in, Connor would know what it is and could correct Joe.

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"And Joe did exactly what we thought he would do with the ball. He was very accurate when he threw it. … He pushed the ball downfield a little bit better than what Connor had done in the past. But you got to see part of the other problem, too – holding the ball too long in the pocket and turning it over. That's something we can't do."

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