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Follow the NCAA men’s basketball tournament here from the opening game through the national championship game on April 2. We will post reports on every game as soon as they end and provide any other essential information along the way, including a daily television schedule. So if you have filled out a tournament bracket, you can follow along with your picks here.

NCAA men's tournament bracket

Villanova cruises into the championship game with a 95-79 win over Kansas

Villanova's Jalen Brunson (1) drives past Kansas' Malik Newman during the second half in the semifinals of the NCAA tournament on Saturday (David J. Phillip / Associated Press)
Villanova's Jalen Brunson (1) drives past Kansas' Malik Newman during the second half in the semifinals of the NCAA tournament on Saturday (David J. Phillip / Associated Press)

They held a national semifinal Saturday night and it was over before the second timeout.

The NCAA tournament game didn’t officially end at that point, of course, but it could have been halted for public indecency.

The score was Villanova 22, Kansas 4 before seven minutes had expired and that somehow wasn’t as bad as things got for the Jayhawks.

Top-seeded Kansas’ blueblood spilled all over the Alamodome court during a 95-79 whitewashing by the equally seeded but vastly superior Wildcats and their barrage of three-pointers.

Villanova made 18 of 40 three-pointers, nearly equaling the NCAA tournament record of 21 three-pointers set by Loyola Marymount against Michigan in 1990.

Michigan ends Loyola Chicago's Cinderella run with 69-57 win

Michigan's Moritz Wagner reacts during the second half in the semifinals of the NCAA tournament against Loyola Chicago on Saturday (David J. Phillip / Associated Press)
Michigan's Moritz Wagner reacts during the second half in the semifinals of the NCAA tournament against Loyola Chicago on Saturday (David J. Phillip / Associated Press)

Porter Moser had repeatedly told his players that there was no finish line for their season, refusing to limit the improbable possibilities of an upstart team.

Loyola Chicago finally reached the end of its NCAA tournament run Saturday. It wasn’t the one the Ramblers wanted.

A magical three-week ride ended with Sister Jean Dolores-Schmidt being wheeled out of the Alamodome with 99 seconds remaining in 11th-seeded Loyola’s deflating 69-57 loss to third-seeded Michigan in a national semifinal.

The mood was far more upbeat for the Wolverines. Forward Moritz Wagner got a high-five from TBS commentator Grant Hill after leaping over a pack of courtside broadcasters while pursuing a loose ball.

Wagner deserved the gesture after finishing with 24 points and 15 rebounds, carrying the Wolverines (33-7) through long stretches in which he was their only productive player.

He eventually got some help as Michigan ended the game on a 27-10 run that allowed enough breathing room for the Wolverines to insert their benchwarmers in the final seconds. Guard Charles Matthews added 17 points for Michigan, which will play either Villanova or Kansas in the championship game Monday.

Kansas needs overtime to beat Duke 85-81 and reach Final Four

Duke's Trevon Duval reacts during the second half of an Elite Eight game against Kansas. (Jamie Squire / Getty Images)
Duke's Trevon Duval reacts during the second half of an Elite Eight game against Kansas. (Jamie Squire / Getty Images)

Malik Newman scored all 13 of Kansas' points in overtime, and the top-seeded Jayhawks are back in the Final Four for the first time since 2012 after beating No. 2 seed Duke 85-81 in overtime in the Midwest Region final. 

The Jayhawks had failed to get out of the Elite Eight as a No. 1 seed each of the last two years. This time the Jayhawks broke through thanks to a huge performance from Newman, who scored a career-high 32 points. 

Kansas will play top-seeded East Region champion Villanova in the second national semifinal next Saturday in San Antonio. Duke was trying to get to the Final Four for the first time since it won the national championship in 2015. 

Newman made two free throws to tie the game, then gave the Jayhawks the lead for good at with 1:49 left. Newman scored 10 points in the first five minutes of the second half as the Jayhawks quickly erased a 36-33 halftime deficit. 

Trevon Duval scored 20 points to lead Duke. Marvin Bagley III scored 16 in what probably was his last college game. 
 

Villanova holds off Texas Tech 71-59 and gets back to the Final Four

Omari Spellman (14) high-fives teammate Donte DiVincenzo during the second half of an Elite Eight game against the Texas Tech. (Maddie Meyer / Getty Images)
Omari Spellman (14) high-fives teammate Donte DiVincenzo during the second half of an Elite Eight game against the Texas Tech. (Maddie Meyer / Getty Images)

Villanova is headed back to the Final Four. 

The Wildcats will have a chance at their second national championship in three seasons, courtesy of a 71-59 win over Texas Tech in Sunday's East regional final. 

They will play the winner of Kansas and Duke in the Final Four in San Antonio. 

Jalen Brunson led the Wildcats (34-4) with 15 points. Eric Paschall finished with 12 points and a career-high 14 rebounds. 

Donte DiVincenzo and Mikal Bridges each added 12 points. 

Villanova came into the game with 44 3-pointers for the tournament. It had four 3s in Sunday's win, but it was their defense that stood out in this one. 

The Wildcats outrebounded the Red Raiders 51-33, including grabbing 31 defensive rebounds. They also had six steals. 

Keenan Evans led Texas Tech with 12 points. 

Villanova led 36-23 at the half, holding the Red Raiders to a season-low for first half points. The 

The Wildcats' lead grew as high as 15 in the opening minutes of the second half and took advantage of a bevy of Texas Tech fouls, racking up 29 points at the free-throw line. 

The Red Raiders (27-10) were playing in their first Elite Eight and came out on fire, notching and early 9-1 lead. They got as close as 56-51 with less than five minutes to play, but Villanova closed the game on a 15-8 run. 
 

Elite Eight preview: A look at the East and Midwest finals

Texas Tech's Justin Gray finishes off a dunk against Purdue during their Sweet 16 game on Friday night in Boston. (Maddie Meyer / Getty Images)
Texas Tech's Justin Gray finishes off a dunk against Purdue during their Sweet 16 game on Friday night in Boston. (Maddie Meyer / Getty Images)

A look at the Elite Eight games on Sunday.

EAST REGIONAL

at Boston

1 Villanova (33-4) vs. 3 Texas Tech (27-9) 

Time: 11:20 a.m. TV: Ch. 2

Villanova is looking to win its second title in three seasons under coach Jay Wright, while Texas Tech is playing in the Elite Eight for the first time, in coach Chris Beard’s second season. The top-seeded Wildcats have made 44 three-pointers in the tournament so far and have 432 for the season, 11 away from a Division I record. VMI made 442 three-pointers in 2006-07. The Red Raiders’ reserves have played well in the tournament, outscoring Purdue’s reserves 33-6 in the Sweet 16.

Villanova and Texas Tech are two of the best defensive teams left in the field. Including their Big East championship win over Providence, the Wildcats have held opponents to 38% from the field, including 28% from three-point range. The Red Raiders have held tournament opponents to 66 points or fewer.

MIDWEST REGIONAL

at Omaha

1 Kansas (30-7) vs. 2 Duke (29-7) 

Time: 2 p.m. TV: Ch. 2

Kansas might feel like it is more of an underdog than the top-seeded team when it plays Duke and its talented cast of freshman, led by Marvin Bagley III. The Jayhawks have had to scratch their way to the Elite Eight, defeating Seton Hall and Clemson in their last two tournament games by four points each. The Blue Devils cruised into the Sweet 16 before a challenge by Syracuse tested them on Friday.

Although both teams have talented underclassmen, their senior point guards run the show, although each is coming off subpar performances. Devonte’ Graham, the Big 12 player of the year, made only four of 12 shots in Kansas’ 80-76 defeat of Clemson. Grayson Allen connected on only three of 14 three-pointers in a 69-65 victory over Syracuse. The Jayhawks also will rely on sophomore center Udoka Azubuike, who returned to action Friday after injuring a knee in the conference tournament.

Charles Matthews steps up for the Wolverines in regional final

Michigan's Charles Matthews, center, celebrates at the end of the game to defeat Florida State in the regional final of the NCAA tournament. (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)
Michigan's Charles Matthews, center, celebrates at the end of the game to defeat Florida State in the regional final of the NCAA tournament. (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

The shot will be forgotten amid the shower of maize and blue confetti at Staples Center, the new Final Four T-shirts and hats Michigan players tugged on, the wide grins as they posed with the hefty trophy after beating Florida State in the West Regional final.

But Charles Matthews made certain the third-seeded Wolverines had reason to celebrate Saturday.

“You’ve got to find a way to make it happen,” he said.

That’s exactly what Matthews did.

Less than four minutes remained. The game Michigan once led by 10 points had turned into a tense, back-and-forth contest.

The Wolverines couldn’t seem to put the game out of reach in the face of ninth-seeded Florida State’s relentless, pressing defense. Michigan managed only one field goal in nearly six crucial minutes. Its lead shriveled to three points.

Then with 3 minutes 51 seconds left, Matthews drove toward the basket, spun and hit a fadeaway jump shot that looked like a move by an NBA veteran.

The redshirt sophomore, who finished with a game-high 17 points in addition to eight rebounds, finally gave Michigan room to breathe.

Michigan defeats Florida State to advance to Final Four

Michigan's Muhammad-Ali Abdur-Rahkman (12) shoots against Florida State's Terance Mann (14) during an NCAA tournament regional final. (Alex Gallardo / Associated Press)
Michigan's Muhammad-Ali Abdur-Rahkman (12) shoots against Florida State's Terance Mann (14) during an NCAA tournament regional final. (Alex Gallardo / Associated Press)

Duncan Robinson took a pass in the corner, rose for a three-pointer that fell through the basket and whirled around to momentarily watch his teammates commence Michigan’s celebration in earnest.

The long-range shot gave the Wolverines a 10-point cushion over Florida State on Saturday night at Staples Center, seemingly more than enough with a little more than two minutes to play.

They ended up needing every bit of it.

A flurry of missed free throws ignited a furious Seminoles rally that allowed P.J. Savoy to take what would have been a tying three-pointer with 58 seconds left.

It bounced off the rim, allowing Michigan to finally exhale after a 58-54 victory in the West Regional final.

The third-seeded Wolverines will play 11th-seeded Loyola Chicago on March 31 in a national semifinal at the Alamodome in San Antonio. Michigan (32-7) will make its eighth trip to the Final Four and first since 2013 after setting a school record for victories.

Final Four bound: No. 11 Loyola Chicago beats Kansas State 78-62

Loyola Chicago's Marques Townes dribbles past Kansas State's Kamau Stokes. (David Goldman / Associated Press)
Loyola Chicago's Marques Townes dribbles past Kansas State's Kamau Stokes. (David Goldman / Associated Press)

Sister Jean and the Loyola Ramblers are headed to the Final Four. 

This improbable NCAA tournament just took its craziest turn yet. 

Ben Richardson scored 23 points and 11th-seeded Loyola romped to a 78-62 victory over No. 9 Kansas State on Saturday night, capping a remarkable run through the bracket-busting South Region. 

The Ramblers (32-5) matched the lowest-seeded team ever to reach the Final Four, joining LSU (1986), George Mason (2006) and VCU (2011). Those other three all lost in the national semifinals. 

Don't bet against Loyola, which emerged from a region that produced a staggering array of upsets. The South became the first region in tournament history to have the top four seeds — including overall No. 1 Virginia — knocked out on the opening weekend. 

In the end, it was the Ramblers cutting down the nets. 

And after three close calls, this one was downright easy. 

“Final Four! Final Four!” the scarf-clad faithful from Chicago chanted as the final seconds ticked off. 

Loyola continued to be inspired by its 98-year-old team chaplain, Sister Jean Dolores-Schmidt, who led a prayer in the locker room before the game, then was pushed onto the court in her wheelchair to join the celebration when it was done. Joining the celebration were Jerry Harkness and other members of the Ramblers’ 1963 national championship team, which played one of the most socially significant games in college basketball history on its way to the title. 

It was known as the “Game of Change,” matching the Ramblers and their mostly black roster against an all-white Mississippi State team at the height of the civil rights movement, setting up an even more significant contest three years later when Texas Western, with five African American starters, defeated Kentucky in the national championship game. 

Even with a title on their resume, this performance came out of nowhere. Loyola had not made the tournament since 1985 until they broke the drought by winning the Missouri Valley Conference. 

Then, as if benefiting from some sort of divine intervention, the Ramblers won their first three tournament games by a total of four points. 

Finally, with the Final Four on the line, they turned in a thoroughly dominating performance. 

Not the least bit intimidated, Loyola came out in attack mode right from the start against a ninth-seeded Kansas State team that rode a stifling defense to the regional final. Moving the ball just as you’d expect from a veteran squad with two seniors and two fourth-year juniors in the starting lineup, the Ramblers kept getting open looks and shot 56% in the opening half, opening up a 36-24 lead. 

The Ramblers really turned it on in the second half. 

Richardson swished a three-pointer as he was fouled by Kamau Stokes, winding up flat on his back while flashing a huge smile with his arms raised above his head. He knocked down the free throw to complete the four-point play, stretching the lead to 44-29. 

Things went so well for the Ramblers that they actually increased their lead during the first television timeout of the second half. The officials went back and reviewed a replay of Donte Ingram’s jumper in the opening minute of the period, ruling he was behind the three-point line when he released the shot to change the margin from 46-33 to 47-33. 

Not that it mattered at the end. 
 

Elite Eight preview: A look at the South and West finals

Florida State guard Terance Mann drives past Gonzaga forward Corey Kispert during the second half of their Sweet 16 game. (Alex Gallardo / Associated Press)
Florida State guard Terance Mann drives past Gonzaga forward Corey Kispert during the second half of their Sweet 16 game. (Alex Gallardo / Associated Press)


SOUTH REGIONAL

at Atlanta

9 Kansas State (25-11) vs. 11 Loyola Chicago (31-5) 

Time: 3 p.m. TV: TBS.

Loyola Chicago’s 13-game win streak is the longest active in the nation. The Ramblers have won their three NCAA tournament games by a combined four points. For Kansas State, defense has been key. The Wildcats held Kentucky to a season-low point total in a 61-58 victory and have held opponents under 59 points in seven consecutive games. They will be defending a team that made 75% of its shots in the second half against Nevada. Loyola-Chicago will be seeking its second Final Four appearance, the first coming in 1963 when it won the national championship. Kansas State last appeared in the Final Four in 1964, where the Wildcats lost to UCLA.

WEST REGIONAL

at Staples Center

3 Michigan (31-7) vs. 9 Florida State (23-11) 

Time: 5:45 p.m. TV: TBS.

Florida State is seeking its fourth consecutive tournament upset. If Michigan advances, it would have a school-record 32 wins and its first Final Four appearance since 2013. The Seminoles, whose only Final Four trip came in 1972, are playing an Elite Eight game for the third time in school history. The Wolverines have reached this plateau three of the last six years. Florida State uses 11 players extensively, and nine Seminoles are scoring at least 6.6 points per game. Florida State likes to employ a full-court defense described by Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski as a “containment press.” Michigan is riding a 12-game winning streak, with its last loss coming Feb. 6 at Northwestern.

Texas Tech pulls away from Purdue in the final minutes to reach its first Elite Eight

Texas Tech's Zach Smith celebrates as the Red Raiders open a big lead against Purdue during the second half Friday night. (Elsa Garrison / Getty Images)
Texas Tech's Zach Smith celebrates as the Red Raiders open a big lead against Purdue during the second half Friday night. (Elsa Garrison / Getty Images)

Texas Tech is headed to the Elite Eight for the first time in program history. 

Keenan Evans had 16 points as the third-seeded Red Raiders overcame an early first-half hole and dominated second-seeded Purdue down the stretch to earn a 78-65 victory in the Sweet 16 on Friday night. 

Texas Tech will play top seed Villanova in the East Regional final Sunday. 

Zach Smith added 14 points and five rebounds. 

Texas Tech trailed by as many as seven points in the first half. But it closed the period on a 10-0 run to take a 30-25 halftime advantage. Purdue got it down to one early in the second, but the Red Raiders never surrendered the lead. 

Carsen Edwards led Purdue with 30 points, including four three-pointers. 

The Boilermakers (30-7) were playing in their second straight regional semifinal. They were denied what would have been their first Elite Eight berth since 2000. 

Purdue came in ranked second nationally in three-point percentage and connected on seven of 18 for the game. But the Boilermakers allowed the Red Raiders 17 second-chance points. 

Texas Tech (27-9) also got 33 points from its bench, compared to just six for Purdue. 
 

Duke holds off the long reach of Syracuse to advance to Elite Eight

Duke forward Marvin Bagley III dunks the ball against Syracuse during the second half Friday night. (Streeter Lecka / Getty Images)
Duke forward Marvin Bagley III dunks the ball against Syracuse during the second half Friday night. (Streeter Lecka / Getty Images)

Duke found a way to crack Syracuse's zone defense, and now the Blue Devils are back in the Elite Eight for the first time since the 2015 team won it all. 

Freshman Marvin Bagley III turned in a giant second-half effort, and second-seeded Duke held off the 11th-seeded Orange in a 69-65 chess match of a victory in the Midwest Region semifinals Friday night. 

All that talk about busted brackets and the maddest March ever — not happening in the Midwest. 

The win by Duke (29-7) set up a 1 vs. 2 showdown against Kansas, which also escaped with a four-point win earlier against Clemson. 

Syracuse (23-14), the last at-large team invited to the tournament, saw its unlikely run to the Sweet 16 end — unable to overcome 16 turnovers against a Mike Krzyzewski-designed zone that was every bit as pesky as Jim Boeheim's vaunted 2-3. 

Bagley scored 13 of his 22 points and had all eight of his rebounds in the second half. Seven of those boards were on the offensive end and led to second-chance baskets. 

But Syracuse stayed in it until the end. Not until Gary Trent Jr., made two free throws with 6.3 seconds left was this game sealed. 

Tyus Battle led the Orange with 19 points.

Villanova becomes the second No. 1 seed to make it to Elite Eight

Villanova's Omari Spellman celebrates with teammate Collin Gillespie (2) during the second half Friday. (Maddie Meyer / Getty Images)
Villanova's Omari Spellman celebrates with teammate Collin Gillespie (2) during the second half Friday. (Maddie Meyer / Getty Images)

Villanova’s three-point party rolled past the pressure of West Virginia to bring the Wildcats to the doorstep of another Final Four two seasons after winning a national championship. 

The top-seeded Wildcats continued their outside feast, downing the fifth-seeded Mountaineers 90-78 on Friday night to earn their second trip to the regional finals in three seasons. 

Jalen Brunson led Villanova with 27 points and Omari Spellman added 18 with eight rebounds as the Wildcats overcame the West Virginia press by hitting 13 of 24 shots from three-point range. 

Jevon Carter and Sagaba Konate each had 12 points to lead West Virginia. 

Villanova (33-4) has now made 47 three-pointers for the tournament. The outside shots helped the Wildcats overcome 16 turnovers. 

Villanova’s Sweet 16 plan for the team nicknamed “Press Virginia:” Attack the stifling defense head-on. 

The Wildcats struggled at times, especially in the first half, but dug out of a six-point hole in the second half with an 11-0 run. 

“What a game, man. I hope that looked as good as it did from the bench, man,” Villanova coach Jay Wright said. “That was the most physically demanding, mentally draining 40 minutes we've played in a long time. They are so relentless.” 

The Mountaineers (26-11) stayed close throughout the night, ramping up the pressure and making Villanova play faster than it wanted to early. But foul trouble throughout the second half was too much for West Virginia to overcome after it gave up the lead. 

Carter was called for his third with 17:33 left in the game. That was followed by Daxter Miles being whistled for his third and fourth fouls over a two-minute stretch that sent him to the bench with 15 minutes remaining. 

West Virginia was able to adjust for a while and took advantage of a more than three-minute Villanova scoring drought to take a 60-54 edge with just over 11 minutes left. 

But Villanova heated up again. Its 11-point run was capped by a thunderous block and dunk on the other end by Omari Spellman that pushed the Wildcats back in front 65-60. 

The Wildcats kept the momentum going, stretching the lead to 76-66 on a three-pointer by Brunson. 

West Virginia never got closer than four points the rest of the way. 

Villanova led 44-42 at the half after a fast-paced opening 20 minutes. Brunson led all scorers with 16 points in the half, with West Virginia getting 11 points from Miles. 

The Wildcats came out firing, connecting on their first seven field goals. They handled the Mountaineers' pressure well early. But the Wildcats had three turnovers over a 65-second stretch during an 8-0 Mountaineers run that put West Virginia in front 33-30. 

Top-seeded Kansas gets back to the Elite Eight with 80-76 defeat of Clemson

Kansas' Marcus Garrett is fouled by Clemson's Elijah Thomas during the second half Friday. (Jamie Squire / Getty Images)
Kansas' Marcus Garrett is fouled by Clemson's Elijah Thomas during the second half Friday. (Jamie Squire / Getty Images)

Kansas made it through the Sweet 16 for the third year in a row as a No. 1 seed after surviving a late scare and beating fifth-seeded Clemson 80-76 in a Midwest Region semifinal. 

Now the Jayhawks will try to get through the Elite Eight for the first time since they won the 2012 national title. They'll play Sunday against the winner of Friday night's second semifinal between No. 2-seeded Duke and No. 11 Syracuse. 

Clemson, in a regional semifinal for the first time since 1997, had a six-minute field goal drought and shot 36% in the first half. The Tigers trailed by 20 early in the second half. 

But a 26-12 run fueled by Gabe DeVoe got Clemson within 74-68. DeVoe's two free throws pulled the Tigers to 78-74 with 14 seconds left, but the Jayhawks were able to hang on. 

Malik Newman scored 17 points to lead Kansas, Devonte Graham added 16 while Udoka Azubuike contributed 14 points and 11 rebounds before fouling out with 2:30 left. 

DeVoe finished with a career-high 31 points.

Kentucky's John Calipari says his players meant no disrespect by skipping postgame handshakes with Kansas State

John Calipari (Kevin C. Cox / Getty Images)
John Calipari (Kevin C. Cox / Getty Images)

Some Kansas State players felt disrespected Thursday night after their Kentucky counterparts did not take part in the traditional postgame handshake following the teams’ Sweet 16 game Thursday night.

“That’s not the sportsmanship you like to see, but that’s them,” Kansas State forward Levi Stockard III said after his team’s 61-58 victory. “They just walked off the court. I don’t know what it was. I don’t know.”

Junior guard Amaad Wainright said: “They didn’t shake our hands. It’s sorry.

“On that situation, it’s all about respect. That’s what it should have been — all about respect.”

But Kentucky coach John Calipari told reporters later that night no disrespect was intended.

“My team’s not like that. Neither is our program,” he said. “There’s no disrespect in any way. They beat us. They deserved to win the game.”

Calipari added that he was able to shake the Kansas State coaches’ hands and made an attempt to do so with the opposing teams’ players as well.

“I went down to shake their hands, too, and they were turned and celebrating. So I walked off,” Calipari said. “No disrespect for anything, just that they were celebrating and I was happy for them.”

NCAA tournament schedule for Friday and Saturday

Kansas guard Malik Newman after scoring against Seton Hall during a second-round game. (Jamie Squire / Getty Images)
Kansas guard Malik Newman after scoring against Seton Hall during a second-round game. (Jamie Squire / Getty Images)

NCAA TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE

All times Pacific (*approximate time; game will start 30 minutes after the completion of the previous one):

FRIDAY SWEET 16

MIDWEST REGIONAL

at Omaha, Neb.

1 Kansas (29-7) vs. 5 Clemson (25-9) 4 p.m.

2 Duke (28-7) vs. 11 Syracuse (23-13) *6:30 p.m.

EAST REGIONAL

at Boston

1 Villanova (32-4) vs. 5 West Virginia (26-10) 4:15 p.m.

2 Purdue (30-6) vs. 3 Texas Tech (26-9) *6:45 p.m.

SATURDAY ELITE EIGHT

SOUTH REGIONAL

at Atlanta

5 Kentucky (26-10) vs. 9 Kansas State (24-11), *6:30 p.m.

WEST REGIONAL

at Staples Center

3 Michigan (30-7) vs. 7 Texas A&M (22-12), 4:30 p.m.
 

NCAA Sweet 16: East Regional preview

Purdue forward Matt Haarms celebrates a win over Butler on Sunday. (Paul Sancya)
Purdue forward Matt Haarms celebrates a win over Butler on Sunday. (Paul Sancya)

EAST REGIONAL

at Boston

1 Villanova (32-4) vs. 5 West Virginia (26-10) 

Time: 4:15 p.m. PDT. TV: TBS.

Villanova, which won the national championship in 2016, is one of two No. 1 seeds left in the tournament following losses by Big East Conference rival Xavier and Virginia. The Wildcats were also a No. 1 seed in last year’s tournament when they lost to eighth-seeded Wisconsin in the second round. West Virginia has been one of the best-looking teams in the field so far, winning by 17 and 23 points in the first two rounds. The Mountaineers are trying to get to the Elite Eight for the first time since their Final Four run in 2010. 

2 Purdue (30-6) vs. 3 Texas Tech (26-9) 

Time: 6:45 p.m. PDT. TV: TBS.

Matt Haarms, a 7-foot-3 redshirt freshman, is expected to start again at center for Purdue even though senior Isaac Haas got fitted with a new brace to protect his fractured right elbow. The 7-foot Haas, who was hurt in the Boilermakers’ first-round win over Cal State Fullerton, has not been cleared to play. “If I did play, it would just be really short minutes,” Haas said. Texas Tech is in the Sweet 16 for the first time since 2005 and is looking to make it to the Elite Eight for the first time in program history. Senior guard Keenan Evans has scored 23 and 22 points in the Red Raiders’ first two tournament wins. 

NCAA Sweet 16: Midwest Regional preview

Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) grabs a rebound against Seton Hall forward Michael Nzei (1) during the second half of a second-round game. (Orlin Wagner / Associated Press)
Kansas center Udoka Azubuike (35) grabs a rebound against Seton Hall forward Michael Nzei (1) during the second half of a second-round game. (Orlin Wagner / Associated Press)

MIDWEST REGIONAL

at Omaha

1 Kansas (29-7) vs. 5 Clemson (25-9) 

Time: 4 p.m. PDT. TV: Channel 2.

Kansas big man Udoka Azubuike, who leads the nation in shooting percentage at 77.5%, is likely to start. Azubuike missed the Big 12 tournament because of a minor knee injury, but he played 22 minutes in an 83-79 win over Seton Hall last weekend. The “neutral-floor” game should be more like a home game for the Jayhawks. Clemson reached its first Sweet 16 since 1997 with a 31-point win over Auburn. This will be the first meeting between the schools.

2 Duke (28-7) vs. 11 Syracuse (23-13) 

Time: 6:30 p.m. PDT. TV: Channel 2.

Duke averages 85 points a game but the Blue Devils will face a Syracuse team that has held three straight opponents to 60 points or fewer in the NCAA tournament. The Orange won a play-in game over Arizona State in Dayton, Ohio. Duke and Syracuse met once in Atlantic Coast Conference play, the Blue Devils winning 60-44 on their home court on Feb. 24. The teams combined to miss their first 24 three-point shots.
 

Michigan runs wild over Texas A&M 99-72 to reach Elite Eight

Michigan forward Moritz Wagner was running so hard while driving for a layup in the game’s opening minutes that his momentum carried him a couple of steps past the basket stanchion after he absorbed a foul.

He spotted a pack of Wolverines fans sitting beyond the baseline inside Staples Center and threw up both arms to encourage more noise from what felt like a home crowd.

The decibel level rarely fell the rest of the way among those wearing maize and blue.

Florida State takes down Gonzaga to earn date with Michigan in Elite 8

Florida State’s unlikely run through the NCAA tournament continued Thursday.

Behind a deep roster and press that wore down fourth-seeded Gonzaga, the ninth-seeded Seminoles surprised the Bulldogs 75-60 at Staples Center to advance to the Elite Eight.

Florida State plays Michigan on Saturday at Staples Center with a trip to the Final Four at stake.

Kansas State sinks Kentucky 61-58 to reach Elite Eight

Kansas State's Cartier Diarra huddles with teammates during the second half against Kentucky. (Ronald Martinez / Getty Images)
Kansas State's Cartier Diarra huddles with teammates during the second half against Kentucky. (Ronald Martinez / Getty Images)

Kansas State’s dream of its first Final Four since 1964 is alive. 

Barry Brown’s tiebreaking layup with 19 seconds remaining was the difference as Kansas State beat Kentucky 61-58 on Thursday night in the South Region semifinal. 

Kansas State, a No. 9 seed, will play No. 11 seed Loyola Chicago on Saturday in a regional final pairing no one could have predicted. 

Kentucky’s Shai Gilgeous-Alexander missed a potential tying three-pointer at the final buzzer for Kentucky (26-11). 

Kansas State (25-11) overcame the loss of top scorer Xavier Sneed, who had 22 points before fouling out with 1:14 remaining. 

Sneed, who had nine points in the first half, was unstoppable in the second half. He scored 13 points in the first 11:30 of the second half before he was called for his fourth foul with 8:24 remaining. 

When Sneed took a seat on the bench, Kansas State lost its momentum. It led 52-44 when Sneed collected his fourth foul and led only 56-55 when he returned with 2:13 remaining, with Kentucky fans chanting “Go Big Blue” to encourage the comeback. 
 

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