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After finishing basketball careers at Coppin State, Aaron and Andrew Robinson launching into sports journalism

Coppin State basketball players Aaron Robinson, second from left, and twin brother Andrew Robinson, third from left, pose with coach Juan Dixon and teammate Kamar McKnight on senior day Feb. 22, 2020.
Coppin State basketball players Aaron Robinson, second from left, and twin brother Andrew Robinson, third from left, pose with coach Juan Dixon and teammate Kamar McKnight on senior day Feb. 22, 2020. (Tqueen)

Instead of making news, Aaron and Andrew Robinson have been breaking it.

After wrapping up their college basketball careers with one season for the Coppin State men’s program, the twins and graduate student guards have shifted their focus to their sports news website All Facts Media and their Twitter account. Over the weekend, the Robinson brothers broke the news that Quinnipiac’s Kevin Marfo and Rich Kelly, two of the top graduate student transfers in NCAA Division I, had committed to Texas A&M and Boston College, respectively.

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“I think it’s a great way to start,” Aaron Robinson, 23, said. “We’re extremely young and extremely excited about the attention we have been getting. So we’re just going to try to keep it up and keep building the momentum.”

Marfo, a 6-foot-8, 245-pound redshirt junior forward who led the nation in rebounding with 13.3 per game and added 10.2 points per game and 17 double doubles, announced his decision Friday night to play for the Aggies during an interview streamed live on the brothers’ Twitter account, @AllFactsMedia.

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Two days later, Kelly, a 6-1, 175-pound junior guard who led the Bobcats in scoring at 16.7 points per game, free-throw percentage at .891 and assists at 4.5 per game, announced that he would go to the Eagles.

Marfo said he was happy to make his announcement with the Robinsons because of how they treated him after transferring to Quinnipiac from George Washington in 2017.

“When I first got to Quinnipiac, they were some of the first people to instill confidence within me after I transferred from George Washington,” he said. “They were one of my first friends. They’re like my brothers. They took care of me, they made my time there comfortable, and they made sure that they had my back. That’s one thing about the Robinson brothers. They take care of each other, and they take care of their own. They’re loyal, and they appreciate everyone around them that helped them. They’re the type of guys that you want to see succeed because they just do it the right way, and they’re just so authentic and genuine that you have to help them with anything they want to do because they’ll do the same thing for you.”

Kelly said it was an easy choice for him and Marfo to publicize their decisions with the Robinsons rather than a more established presence in the college basketball arena.

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“I know them personally and know how trustworthy they are and how they convey the message accurately of what I’m trying to get across,” he said. “When you go to bigger reporters, you don’t know them personally. So you don’t really know how your story’s going to get out there. But I knew I could speak to their character. So it came down to trust and what I’ve seen them do before.”

The brothers have been interested in writing since attending Springbrook High School in Montgomery County. Andrew Robinson, who is four minutes younger than his brother, was the opinion page editor for the school’s student newspaper as a junior and the sports editor as a senior, while Aaron Robinson worked for the school yearbook.

Quinnipiac and Siena were the only two universities willing to offer scholarships to the twins for the 2015-16, but the former’s journalism program — ranked among the top 10 by LinkedIn for best schools for media professionals — convinced the twins to select the Bobcats.

“That definitely played a large role because they had a great communications program,” said Andrew, who with Aaron worked for the university’s Q30 Television network. “And you’re right between two major news markets in New York City and Boston. So it was a great location.”

At Quinnipiac, the brothers faced a dilemma when their teammates questioned why their classmates working as journalists for the campus newspaper and television station scrutinized the team’s problems and issues.

“They were like, ‘We see these guys at the cafeteria and in the hallways, and they’re saying this about our team?’” Aaron Robinson recalled. “I had to explain to them, ‘This is not PR. Journalists’ job is not to report what’s good, they have to report the truth.’ If we lose three games in a row, they’re going to write a story about how we haven’t been defending well or how we haven’t been making our free throws in a game or how we’ve been turning the ball over a lot.”

After graduating from Quinnipiac with bachelor’s in broadcast journalism, the Robinsons transferred to Coppin State. Andrew Robinson averaged 12.1 points and 4.9 rebounds in 31 starts for the Eagles (11-20), while Aaron Robinson averaged 5.4 points and 3.2 rebounds.

Last October, the brothers launched their Twitter account and then followed suit with the website. They have written articles on the obstacles African-American college athletes face when considering protesting, the legacy left behind by the late Kobe Bryant, and the decisions facing spring-sports athletes granted another year of eligibility by the NCAA because of the coronavirus pandemic.

They made perhaps their biggest splash last weekend. Their interview with Marfo had more than 55,000 views, while their interview with Kelly had almost 39,000 views as of Tuesday. They nearly tripled their number of followers on Twitter to 611.

“We had no idea how big it would get and how much it would blow up,” Aaron Robinson said. “Jeff Goodman [of Stadium] had quoted one of our tweets, and Jon Rothstein [of CBS Sports] had quoted one of our tweets, and Jeff Borzello [of ESPN] had quoted one of our tweets. We had no idea that would ever happen. It was kind of just a shock when it did happen. We were definitely really happy and excited for the work we had put in to finally get some recognition for it.”

Andrew Robinson said he and his brother are deeply grateful for Marfo’s and Kelly’s trust in them.

“There’s a lot of guys in the media they could have given their stories to, the bigger names,” he said. “I’m sure they had guys like ESPN and CBS and recruiting services hitting them up to get their stories. So it really meant a lot to us that they allowed us to do that and really help us to advance our vision for our brand.”

Kelly said he was more than happy to do what he could for the brothers.

“They’ve helped me way more in life than I’ve helped them,” he said. “I got to Quinnipiac, and they showed me the ropes, and they really helped me adjust to college life. So this is the least I could do for them, and I still have a lot more to do to repay the debt of what they’ve done for me.”

The Robinson twins said they intend to pursue playing professional basketball either domestically or overseas. But after basketball, they would like to follow role models such as Stephen A. Smith of ESPN and Jemele Hill of The Atlantic and eventually become co-hosts of their own sports talk show.

Marfo said he could foresee the brothers making it big in sports journalism.

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“They can go far because they’re so trustworthy and genuine and authentic,” he said. “People automatically gravitate towards them. There’s not a lot of people like the Robinson twins. They do it the right way. Anyone who has ever come into contact with them knows that these guys are great human beings and great people.”

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So do they have any more breaking news in the works? Andrew Robinson played it coy.

“I don’t want to spoil it right now,” he said. “I hope people stay tuned to our website and continue to follow us on Twitter. We definitely have a lot of stuff coming down the pipeline that I think people are going to enjoy.”

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