Towson head coach Pat Skerry talks with player, Eddie Keith II, during the first half an NCAA college basketball game against Oklahoma State at the Charleston Classic at TD Arena, Thursday Nov. 19, 2015, in Charleston, S.C.
Towson head coach Pat Skerry talks with player, Eddie Keith II, during the first half an NCAA college basketball game against Oklahoma State at the Charleston Classic at TD Arena, Thursday Nov. 19, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (Mic Smith / Associated Press)

The latest game in a series dubbed "The Battle for Greater Baltimore" turned into a war of attrition Saturday.

In a game that featured 60 fouls and 75 free throws, the visiting Towson basketball team survived mostly intact, outscoring Coppin State at the foul line and soundly winning the rebounding battle in an 81-77 overtime win.

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"The refs called it tight. There were a couple calls we didn't agree with, but we just had to play through it," Tigers forward John Davis said. "We tried to beat the team and, obviously, beat the refs."

Davis finished with 15 points and a game-high nine rebounds to go along with 20 points from point guard Byron Hawkins — including 11 of 13 from the foul line — and 17 from forward William Adala Moto.

In overtime, the 6-6 Adala Moto hit some of the Tigers' most crucial shots, rebounding and putting back his own blocked shot to break a 71-71 tie, then nailing a turnaround jumper in the lane to increase the lead to four with 2:33 left.

After Towson's Eddie Keith II tipped in Davis' miss, Coppin cut the lead to two on Christian Kessee's three-pointer with 1:10 to play. Josh Treadwell's attempted three-pointer from the corner bounced out with 7.5 seconds left, and Towson's Byron Hawkins and Adala Moto then sealed the win by each hitting a pair of free throws.

All told, Towson was 31-48 from the line.

"I think it will serve us well later on that we persevered," Tigers coach Pat Skerry said. "We've never had that foul trouble in my five years. I guess everything happens at some point. We couldn't put it away because we were an atrocity from the foul line … but we got through it. For a young team like ours, it's good to get the first road win."

Towson (4-3) extended its overall winning streak to three, after a two-point win over Bradley in a tournament in South Carolina and a blowout against Division III Gallaudet. Towson also recorded its third win over Coppin in as many years.

It was the Tigers' second win in the "Baltimore" series, after topping Morgan State earlier this month. They will face Loyola and UMBC next month.

After trailing by as many as 10 midway through the second half, Coppin had a chance to win in regulation. Towson's Timajh Parker-Rivera, however, blocked Treadwell's fallaway at the buzzer, forcing overtime.

Treadwell finished with 15 points and Keith Shivers had 14 to lead five Coppin players in double figures. But it also was a frustrating night for Eagles leading scorer Terry Harris, who made just one of his nine shots from the field before fouling out with 9:26 to play.

Harris, who entered the night averaging a team-best 18 points per game and 10.5 rebounds, finished with four points and five rebounds.

"We went into the game not thinking that we were going to have half of our team in foul trouble in the first half. But that's just the way it fell, and we had to utilize our bench a little bit more," Eagles coach Michael Grant said. "It was just one of those who was going to make the most free throws and who was going to execute at the end. I thought [Towson] did a really good job of executing toward the end of the ballgame."

Coppin (2-3), which has 10 newcomers and was picked by coaches to finish 11th in the 13-team Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference, has yet to beat a Division I team this season. After opening with lopsided losses to Eastern Kentucky and Iowa, the Eagles defeated Division II Goldey-Beacom and Chestnut Hill.

"When you look at 10 brand-new faces that have never played Division I basketball, now we have to teach them how to win at this level," Grant said. "It's going to take some time, but we're playing a whole lot better. Once they learn how to close out a game, I think they're going to be pretty good."

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