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This Week in Baltimore Sports History: Pearl of a debut for Earl Monroe with Bullets

Earl "The Pearl" Monroe played 14 season in the NBA, including the first five with the Baltimore Bullets.
Earl "The Pearl" Monroe played 14 season in the NBA, including the first five with the Baltimore Bullets. (Baltimore Sun 1968)

Sept. 24, 1997: “We did it; we went wire-to-wire,” manager Davey Johnson boasts after the Orioles clinch the American League East with a 9-3 win over the Blue Jays in Toronto. Baltimore becomes only the sixth big league team to hold first place from the first day of the season to the last.

Sept. 24, 1967: In his first NBA game with the Bullets, rookie guard Earl Monroe scores 22 points as Baltimore defeats the Detroit Pistons, 127-113, in an exhibition in Steubenville, Ohio.

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Sept. 22, 1966: A 6-1 victory over the Athletics in Kansas City gives the Orioles their first American League pennant. The game ends with a spectacular diving catch by outfielder Russ Snyder.

Hall of Fame wide receiver Raymond Berry played 13 seasons in the NFL, all with the Baltimore Colts.
Hall of Fame wide receiver Raymond Berry played 13 seasons in the NFL, all with the Baltimore Colts.

Sept. 28, 1958: The Colts rally for two late touchdowns to beat the Detroit Lions, 28-15, in their NFL opener at Memorial Stadium. Raymond Berry catches 10 passes from Johnny Unitas, including two scores.

Sept. 23, 1944: In a nailbiter, Poly defeats Southern, 7-0, in football before 8,000 fans at Baltimore Stadium. On the final play, Poly safety Charley Kreis makes a diving tackle at his team’s 1-yard line to preserve the win.

Sept. 28, 1938: Seabiscuit, the celebrated 5-year-old racehorse, wins the 27th Havre de Grace Handicap by 2½ lengths in near-record time before a cheering crowd of 12,000 at the Harford County track.

Sept. 28, 1929: In its first football game, the University of Baltimore falls to Western Maryland (now McDaniel), 34-0, in Westminster. Five players score touchdowns for coach Dick Harlow’s Terrors.

Sept. 24, 1914: Babe Ruth, sold by the International League Orioles to the Boston Red Sox in July, returns to pitch the Providence Grays (Boston’s farm club) to a 4-2 victory over Baltimore. Ruth allows seven hits and four walks, with eight strikeouts — but fails to get a hit.

Baltimore native George Young, a City College graduate, led the New York Giants to two Super Bowl titles as general manager. Young, 71, died in 2001.
Baltimore native George Young, a City College graduate, led the New York Giants to two Super Bowl titles as general manager. Young, 71, died in 2001. (Corey Sipkin/New York Daily News)

Birthday

Sept. 22, 1930: George Young, who played football at Calvert Hall, then coached there, at City College and for the Baltimore Colts before becoming general manager of the New York Giants and leading them to two NFL championships. Young died in 2001.

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