Frank Urso, who helped Maryland win the 1973 and 1975 national lacrosse championships, is pictured in January 1976.
Frank Urso, who helped Maryland win the 1973 and 1975 national lacrosse championships, is pictured in January 1976. (Baltimore Sun photo)

June 2, 1973: Frank Urso’s three goals — including the game-winner in the second overtime — lead Maryland past Johns Hopkins, 10-9, in the third NCAA lacrosse tournament before an announced 7,117 at Franklin Field in Philadelphia.

Eddie Watt, pictured Oct. 9, 1971, pitched for the Orioles from 1966 to 1973.
Eddie Watt, pictured Oct. 9, 1971, pitched for the Orioles from 1966 to 1973. (William H. Mortimer / Baltimore Sun photo)

May 31, 1966: Rookie right-hander Eddie Watt pitches 8 2/3 innings of stellar relief, allowing three hits and one run, as the second-place Orioles defeat the Twins, 14-5, in Minnesota.

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Golfer Deane Beman, who attended Maryland, is shown in a picture dated Jan. 20, 1961.
Golfer Deane Beman, who attended Maryland, is shown in a picture dated Jan. 20, 1961. (Richard Stacks / Baltimore Sun photo)

May 30, 1959: Deane Beman, 21, of Silver Spring wins the British Amateur golf championship at Royal St George’s Club. Beman, a student at Maryland, is the youngest American ever to win the tournament.

Art Donovan takes the field for the Colts' first game in 1962 as the team honors him for his recent retirement. Gifts included a Cadillac, 70 pounds of potato chips and 70 pounds of pretzels.
Art Donovan takes the field for the Colts' first game in 1962 as the team honors him for his recent retirement. Gifts included a Cadillac, 70 pounds of potato chips and 70 pounds of pretzels. (Baltimore Sun photo)

June 2, 1950: The Colts select Art Donovan, a rookie guard from Boston College, in the fourth round of a special dispersal draft of players from teams in the All-America Football Conference that were not absorbed by the NFL.

Pauline Betz, pictured May 17, 1943, won five Grand Slam singles titles.
Pauline Betz, pictured May 17, 1943, won five Grand Slam singles titles. (Baltimore Sun file photo)

May 27, 1947: In a tennis exhibition at L’Hirondelle Club, Pauline Betz, 1946 Wimbledon and U.S. Open champion, defeats Sarah Palfrey Cooke, also a former winner of those two classics, 6-2, 8-6.

An air-raid alarm is tested at Pimlico Race Course in Nov., 7, 1942.
An air-raid alarm is tested at Pimlico Race Course in Nov., 7, 1942. (Baltimore Sun file photo)

May 30, 1942: The Maryland Jockey Club grants the American Red Cross use of the clubhouse at Pimlico Race Course for emergency purposes — as a hospital or first-aid station — for the duration of World War II.

May 27, 1913: The Sun reports that Henry “Doc” Gessler, a former major leaguer, played for the Johns Hopkins baseball team and drove in the only run in a recent 1-0 victory over Navy. Gessler, an outfielder who spent eight years in the big leagues, played the college game under the name of Shultz. He attends medical school at Hopkins.

Connie Mack, the longest-serving manager in major league history, celebrates his 89th birthday on Dec. 22, 1951.
Connie Mack, the longest-serving manager in major league history, celebrates his 89th birthday on Dec. 22, 1951. (Associated Press photo)

June 2, 1896: Ignoring derisive hoots by Pirates manager Connie Mack, the Orioles’ Arlie Pond pitches a four-hitter to defeat Pittsburgh, 10-3, in a National League game. Mack spends the afternoon dancing up and down in the coaches’ box, shouting, “He can’t get ‘em over!” to no avail.

Eric Davis homers off Paul Assenmacher to give the Orioles a 3-0 lead in Game 5 of the ALCS on Oct. 13, 1997. Indians catcher Sandy Alomar Jr. and plate umpire Larry McCoy watch. The Oroles won, 4-2, but lost the series in six games.
Eric Davis homers off Paul Assenmacher to give the Orioles a 3-0 lead in Game 5 of the ALCS on Oct. 13, 1997. Indians catcher Sandy Alomar Jr. and plate umpire Larry McCoy watch. The Oroles won, 4-2, but lost the series in six games. (Amy Sancetta / Associated Press)

Birthday

May 29, 1962: Orioles outfielder Eric Davis, who, while recovering from colon cancer in 1997, hit a lead-extending ninth-inning home run against the Cleveland Indians in Game 5 of the American League Championship Series.

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