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Jen Adams, center, is pictured before Maryland's 11-9 NCAA women's lacrosse quarterfinal win against James Madison on May 13, 2001. Adams, who won four national championships in four years with the Terps, now coaches Loyola Maryland.
Jen Adams, center, is pictured before Maryland's 11-9 NCAA women's lacrosse quarterfinal win against James Madison on May 13, 2001. Adams, who won four national championships in four years with the Terps, now coaches Loyola Maryland. (Nanine Hartzenbusch / Baltimore Sun)

March 5, 1999: Maryland’s top-ranked women’s lacrosse team manages an 8-5 win over Duke in College Park. Quinn Carney (three goals) and Jen Adams (two goals, three assists) lead the four-time defending national champs, who survive a 27-minute scoring drought in the second half.

Loyola basketball player Brian Plunkett is pictured Dec. 8, 1975. He later coached at the school and is now director of alumni and parent giving.
Loyola basketball player Brian Plunkett is pictured Dec. 8, 1975. He later coached at the school and is now director of alumni and parent giving. (George H. Cook / Baltimore Sun)

March 7, 1976: Loyola’s 15th consecutive victory is a 59-55 defeat of Mount Saint Joseph for the Catholic League basketball championship at UMBC. The winners, now 24-5, are led by stars Tony Guy and Pete Budko (14 points each) and unheralded Brian Plunkett (19).

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The 2010 Naismith Hall of Fame class: from left, Larry Bird, representing the 1992 U.S. Olympic team; Walt Bellamy, representing the '60 team, Scottie Pippen, Robert Hurley Sr., Cynthia Cooper, Donna Johnson (wife of Dennis Johnson) and Terry Johnson (brother of Gus Johnson).
The 2010 Naismith Hall of Fame class: from left, Larry Bird, representing the 1992 U.S. Olympic team; Walt Bellamy, representing the '60 team, Scottie Pippen, Robert Hurley Sr., Cynthia Cooper, Donna Johnson (wife of Dennis Johnson) and Terry Johnson (brother of Gus Johnson). (Mark J. Terrill / Associated Press)

March 3, 1965: Though trailing after one quarter, the Bullets set a club scoring mark in a 151-108 NBA rout of the Cincinnati Royals before an announced 9,157 at the Civic Center. Six Baltimore players score in double figures, led by 6-foot-11 Walt Bellamy (32 points) and Don Ohl (27).

First baseman Dick Kryhoski, pictured April 13, 1954, spent one season with the Orioles, hitting .260 with one homer and 34 RBIs in 300 at-bats.
First baseman Dick Kryhoski, pictured April 13, 1954, spent one season with the Orioles, hitting .260 with one homer and 34 RBIs in 300 at-bats. (Baltimore Sun file)

March 6, 1954: The Orioles mark their return to the American League with a 13-5 exhibition win in Mesa, Ariz., over the Chicago Cubsesa, Az. Dick Kryhoski and Jim Fridley homer for Baltimore, which gets 15 hits.

Former Calvert Hall star Franny Bock played three seasons for Loyola College, then later spent a year with the Bullets of the American Basketball League.
Former Calvert Hall star Franny Bock played three seasons for Loyola College, then later spent a year with the Bullets of the American Basketball League. (Baltimore Sun file 1938)

March 7, 1942: With Maryland Gov. Herbert O’Conor in the stands, Loyola College beats Western Maryland, 42-33, at Evergreen to win the Mason-Dixon Conference basketball championship. Greyhounds forward Franny Bock (12 points) leads all scorers.

Frank Cronin attended Maryland on a track scholarship and was a five-time Southern Conference champion in the quarter-mile and a pole vault. He's in the University of Maryland Athlete Hall of Fame, Maryland Boxing Hall of Fame and Middle Atlantic PGA Hall of Fame.
Frank Cronin attended Maryland on a track scholarship and was a five-time Southern Conference champion in the quarter-mile and a pole vault. He's in the University of Maryland Athlete Hall of Fame, Maryland Boxing Hall of Fame and Middle Atlantic PGA Hall of Fame. (Baltimore Sun file)

March 4, 1939: Maryland’s unbeaten boxing team stops previously undefeated Army, 4½ to 3½, at Ritchie Coliseum in College Park. Frank Cronin (Bel Air), the Terps’ 155-pounder who never boxed before his senior year, remains unbeaten. Cronin will later coach Maryland’s golf team for 28 years, including a share of the Atlantic Coast Conference title in 1964.

Jack Cummings, top row, third from right, is pictured with Loyola's 1921-22 team.
Jack Cummings, top row, third from right, is pictured with Loyola's 1921-22 team. (Baltimore Sun file)

March 9, 1922: Loyola defeats City, 30-3, holding the losers to three free throws to win the Baltimore City high school basketball championship. Jack Cummings, a 6-foot-3 center, scores 16 points for the Dons (19-0), who have outscored opponents 917-210.

Babe Ruth is pictured with the Orioles in Fayetteville, N.C., in 1914.
Babe Ruth is pictured with the Orioles in Fayetteville, N.C., in 1914. (News American photo courtesy of Fayetteville CVB)

March 6, 1914: At their spring training site in Fayetteville, N.C., the Orioles are challenged to a basketball game by a local high school team and win, 8-6. “(Ensign) Cottrell, (Ernest) Lidgate and (Babe) Ruth starred for the Birds,” The Sun writes. “These men had played the game before and made some fine passes.”

Jack Fisher, left, celebrates a 1960 Orioles victory with third baseman Brooks Robinson. Fisher was 12-11 that season, the only one of 11 major league years in which he finished with a winning record. He was 86-139 with a 4.06 ERA for the Orioles and four other teams.
Jack Fisher, left, celebrates a 1960 Orioles victory with third baseman Brooks Robinson. Fisher was 12-11 that season, the only one of 11 major league years in which he finished with a winning record. He was 86-139 with a 4.06 ERA for the Orioles and four other teams. (Baltimore Sun file)

Birthday

March 4, 1939: “Fat Jack” Fisher, a Frostburg native and right-handed pitcher who, with the Orioles, surrendered Boston Red Sox Hall of Famer Ted Williams’ final career home run in 1960 and, a year later, Roger Maris’ 60th homer, enabling the New York Yankees slugger to tie Babe Ruth’s single-season record.

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