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The Sun Remembers: This Week in Maryland Sports History for July 1-7

The Sun Remembers: This Week in Maryland Sports History for July 1-7
Former Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Joe Gilliam played for the semipro Baltimore Eagles in the Atlantic Football Conference in 1979. Gilliam, pictured in June 2000 at his camp, died six months later at age 49. (Mark Humphrey / Associated Press)

July 7, 1979: Joe Gilliam passes for 260 yards and two touchdowns as the visiting Baltimore Eagles defeat the Pittsburgh Colts, 22-0, in a preseason semipro football game. Gilliam, a former Pittsburgh Steeler, hits Dan Bungori and Frank Russell, who both starred at Maryland, for scores.

Orioles pitchers, from left, Jim Palmer, Dave McNally, Mike Cuellar and Pat Dobson, all 20-game winners in 1971, are pictured in Cleveland on Sept. 26 of that season.
Orioles pitchers, from left, Jim Palmer, Dave McNally, Mike Cuellar and Pat Dobson, all 20-game winners in 1971, are pictured in Cleveland on Sept. 26 of that season. (UPI)

July 7, 1971: Pat Dobson (9-4) wins his sixth straight game as the Orioles defeat the Washington Senators, 4-0, at Memorial Stadium. Acquired in the offseason, Dobson, 29, will finish 20-8 for the American League champions — his first winning season in the majors.

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Orioles third baseman Brooks Robinson makes a tough play on a ground ball during a game July 27, 1964. He starred in the All-Star Game earlier that month.
Orioles third baseman Brooks Robinson makes a tough play on a ground ball during a game July 27, 1964. He starred in the All-Star Game earlier that month. (Baltimore Sun file photo)

July 7, 1964: The 35th All-Star Game at Shea Stadium in New York is a showcase for the Orioles’ Brooks Robinson. Playing the whole game, the 27-year-old third baseman slashes a two-run triple and a single, while making stellar plays in the field to retire National League stars Orlando Cepeda and Willie Mays. Still, the American League loses, 7-4.

Pro wrestler Haystacks Calhoun, who was known for his strength and enormous size, is pictured Nov. 8, 1964.
Pro wrestler Haystacks Calhoun, who was known for his strength and enormous size, is pictured Nov. 8, 1964. (Baltimore Sun file photo)

July 7, 1959: At the Coliseum, the wrestling team of Haystacks Calhoun, “Handsome” Johnny Barend and Donn Levin wins a best-of-three falls match from The Zebra Kid, Tokyo Joe and Mighty Jumbo.

Holman Williams, a member of the World Boxing Hall of Fame and International Boxing Hall of Fame, is pictured on Oct. 22, 1945.
Holman Williams, a member of the World Boxing Hall of Fame and International Boxing Hall of Fame, is pictured on Oct. 22, 1945. (Baltimore Sun file photo)

July 5, 1940: Holman Williams, a black welterweight boxer from Detroit, wins a 10-round decision from Milo Theodorescu of Romania at the Coliseum. Afterward, to the crowd’s surprise, the loser goes to Williams’ corner and respectfully kisses him on the forehead.

Orioles owner-manager Jack Dunn is shown in a 1921 picture.
Orioles owner-manager Jack Dunn is shown in a 1921 picture. (Baltimore Sun file photo)

July 3, 1919: When Orioles third baseman Otis Lawry is ejected from the game, owner-manager Jack Dunn, 46, plays the last four innings himself in a 7-6 International League win over the Coal Barons in Reading, Pa.

July 6, 1896: After blowing a 9-1 lead, the Orioles rally from a 12-9 deficit to defeat the Chicago Colts, 14-13, in a National League game. With two outs in the ninth inning and the bases loaded, catcher Bill “Boileryard” Clarke hits an 0-2 pitch for a triple to win it.

July 4, 1876: More than 25,000 people converge on Patterson Park — some as early as 4 a.m. — to picnic, play croquet and boat on the lake to celebrate the nation’s centennial.

Outfielder Barry Shetrone, a Southern alumnus, played in 58 games over four seasons with the Orioles.
Outfielder Barry Shetrone, a Southern alumnus, played in 58 games over four seasons with the Orioles. (Handout)
Birthday

July 6, 1938: Barry Shetrone (Southern), an Orioles outfielder from 1959 through 1962 who hit .209. He died in 2001.

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