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The Sun Remembers: This Week in Maryland Sports History for Jan. 13-19

The Sun Remembers: This Week in Maryland Sports History for Jan. 13-19
Bengals coach Marvin Lewis hugs Ravens running back Jamal Lewis, left, and wide receiver Travis Taylor after host Cincinnati's 34-26 win Oct. 19, 2003. Lewis was the Ravens' defensive coordinator from 1996 to 2001. (Mike Simons / Associated Press)

Jan. 14, 2003: Washington Redskins defensive coordinator Marvin Lewis, 44, who as Ravens defensive coordinator helped assemble the 2000 Super Bowl champions, is named head coach of the Cincinnati Bengals — the eighth black head coach in NFL history.

Maryland women's basketball coach Chris Weller pauses for the national anthem Feb. 21, 2002, at the team's last game at Cole Field House before moving to Comcast Center the following season. Weller, who started coaching the Terps in 1975, retired less than two weeks later.
Maryland women's basketball coach Chris Weller pauses for the national anthem Feb. 21, 2002, at the team's last game at Cole Field House before moving to Comcast Center the following season. Weller, who started coaching the Terps in 1975, retired less than two weeks later. (Karl Merton Ferron / Baltimore Sun)

Jan. 17, 2002: “I have to make some big lineup changes,” Maryland women’s basketball coach Chris Weller says after a 52-44 loss to Virginia at Cole Field House. The Terps allow 25 points on turnovers and fail to score in the final 5:19.

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Orioles general manager Pat Gillick, left, shakes the hand of former manager Earl Weaver on Feb. 16, 1996, in front of director of player development Syd Thrift, seated, and director of scouting Gary Nickels.
Orioles general manager Pat Gillick, left, shakes the hand of former manager Earl Weaver on Feb. 16, 1996, in front of director of player development Syd Thrift, seated, and director of scouting Gary Nickels. (Karl Merton Ferron / Baltimore Sun)

Jan. 16, 1997: “It’s a miracle we’re alive,” says Syd Thrift, the Orioles’ director of player development says after he and general manager Pat Gillick are pulled, unharmed, from a car crash on the Baltimore Beltway in which their vehicle flips twice.

Orioles outfielder Frank Robinson, right, is pictured with U.S. decathlete Bill Toomey on Jan. 30, 1967, in Philadelphia. Robinson, the 1966 AL MVP, "slumped" in 1967, hitting 30 home runs with 94 RBIs and a .311 batting average.
Orioles outfielder Frank Robinson, right, is pictured with U.S. decathlete Bill Toomey on Jan. 30, 1967, in Philadelphia. Robinson, the 1966 AL MVP, "slumped" in 1967, hitting 30 home runs with 94 RBIs and a .311 batting average. (Associated Press)

Jan. 14, 1967: “I probably could have gotten a few thousand dollars more, but I didn’t think it was worth haggling over,” outfielder Frank Robinson says as the American League Triple Crown winner signs the first $100,000 contract in Orioles history.

Jan. 14, 1967: Coppin State’s basketball team loses, 94-89, to Bowie State in double overtime. Six Eagles foul out as the losers play the final three minutes with only three players.

Jan. 18, 1962: Dunbar defeats Mount Saint Joseph, 20-10, in wrestling as undefeated Poets Eddie Davis (145 pounds) and John Broadway (165) score their fourth straight pins.

Pitcher Satchel Paige and catcher Roy Campanella, a former Baltimore Elite Giant, are shown in an undated photo. Both are in the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Pitcher Satchel Paige and catcher Roy Campanella, a former Baltimore Elite Giant, are shown in an undated photo. Both are in the Baseball Hall of Fame. (Phillips & Son Photography)

Jan. 13, 1954: Satchel Paige, the Negro leagues pitching great who played last year for the St. Louis Browns, tells reporters he’d like to pitch for their successor, the Orioles, “but I haven’t heard a thing from ’em yet.” Two weeks later, Baltimore releases the 47-year-old Paige, who’ll be enshrined in the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Jan. 15, 1919: Navy routs Mount St, Mary’s, 49-8, in basketball for its ninth win during a 16-0 season. Forward Lance Farwell scores 10 points and will earn All-America honors despite battling influenza much of the year.

A powerful, punishing runner, Ed Modzelewski led the Terps to 10 straight wins in 1951 — their only perfect season in modern history.
A powerful, punishing runner, Ed Modzelewski led the Terps to 10 straight wins in 1951 — their only perfect season in modern history. (Baltimore Sun file)
Birthday

Jan. 13, 1929: Ed “Big Mo” Modzelewski, Maryland fullback and Most Valuable Player of the Terps’ Sugar Bowl champs who defeated Tennessee, 28-13, on New Year’s Day 1952. Modzelewski, who later played for the Cleveland Browns, died in 2015.

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