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The Sun Remembers: This Week in Maryland Sports History for Feb. 17-23

The Sun Remembers: This Week in Maryland Sports History for Feb. 17-23
Guard Juan Dixon (Calvert Hall) was 4-for-5 from 3-point range in Maryland's 95-66 win against visiting North Carolina State. He became only the fifth player in school history to score 30 points on five occasions. (Nanine Hartzenbusch / Baltimore Sun)

Feb. 20, 2001: Buoyed by a pregame pep talk by Brian Billick, coach of the Super Bowl champion Ravens, the slumping Maryland men’s basketball team routs North Carolina State, 95-66, at Cole Field House. Juan Dixon (30 points) hits 11 of his 12 shots from the field.

Frank Robinson displays his 1961 National League MVP award, right, and 1966 American League MVP award, left, Dec. 3, 1971, at his home in Los Angeles. Less than three months later, he was dealt to the Dodgers.
Frank Robinson displays his 1961 National League MVP award, right, and 1966 American League MVP award, left, Dec. 3, 1971, at his home in Los Angeles. Less than three months later, he was dealt to the Dodgers. (Harold Filan / AP)

Feb. 20, 1972: Dealt by the Orioles to Los Angeles in an offseason trade, Frank Robinson, 36, signs a $140,000 contract with the Dodgers.

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Jockey Bobby Corle in February 1962.
Jockey Bobby Corle in February 1962. (Baltimore Sun file)

Feb. 17, 1959: Jockey Bobby Corle, 23, who suffered a broken leg three months ago, rides four winners at Bowie Race Course — including three in a row.

Art Donovan and his wife Dorothy, whom he met on a blind date in 1955, pose with their four children, Art III, Debra Lynn, Christine and Mary on March 17, 1968.
Art Donovan and his wife Dorothy, whom he met on a blind date in 1955, pose with their four children, Art III, Debra Lynn, Christine and Mary on March 17, 1968. (William L. Klender / Baltimore Sun)

Feb. 22, 1955: Art Donovan is honored as the Colts Lineman of 1954 by 600 football fans at the Lord Baltimore Hotel. “Fatso” receives a $4,000 bond, a diamond-studded watch, a key to the city from Mayor Tommy D’Alesandro and a life-sized caricature of himself.

Jim Lacy was a four-time All-Mason-Dixon Conference honoree. He led Loyola College to Mason-Dixon titles in 1947, 1948 and 1949.
Jim Lacy was a four-time All-Mason-Dixon Conference honoree. He led Loyola College to Mason-Dixon titles in 1947, 1948 and 1949. (Walter McCardell / Baltimore Sun)

Feb. 23, 1949: In a 68-46 basketball win over Johns Hopkins at Homewood, Loyola College’s Jim Lacy scores 21 points, giving him 1,999 for his career. He’ll finish with 2,199 — the first player in NCAA history to top the 2,000 mark.

Feb. 22, 1941: Paul McNeil, Maryland’s star light heavyweight wrestler, wins his 36th consecutive bout in the Terps’ 21-11 win over Duke at College Park. A senior, McNeil will finish his college career undefeated (44-0).

Harry Jeffra, pictured Sept. 27, 1939, was a world bantamweight champion. He was inducted into the World Boxing Hall of Fame in 1998.
Harry Jeffra, pictured Sept. 27, 1939, was a world bantamweight champion. He was inducted into the World Boxing Hall of Fame in 1998. (Baltimore Sun file)

Feb. 20, 1938: Harry Jeffra, Baltimore’s world bantamweight boxing champ, loses his title to Sixto Escobar of Puerto Rico in a 15-round decision in San Juan.

Feb. 17, 1931: Ed Ronkin scores 14 points and All-American Bosey Berger adds six as Maryland defeats St. John’s, of Annapolis, 32-27, in basketball at College Park. The Terps go on to win the Southern Conference, defeating Kentucky and first-year coach Adolph Rupp in the final.

Tom Shopay, pictured May 13, 1972, played for the Orioles from 1971 to 1977, batting .214 with one homer and 14 RBIs in 234 at-bats. He previously played for the Yankees.
Tom Shopay, pictured May 13, 1972, played for the Orioles from 1971 to 1977, batting .214 with one homer and 14 RBIs in 234 at-bats. He previously played for the Yankees. (Walter McCardell / Baltimore Sun file)
Birthday

Feb. 21, 1945: Tom Shopay, the Orioles’ gritty utility outfielder who hit .257 in 1971 and helped Baltimore reach the World Series.

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