Advertisement

This Week in Baltimore Sports History: Johnny Unitas leads Colts past College All-Stars

 This Week in Baltimore Sports History: Johnny Unitas leads Colts past College All-Stars
Quarterback Johnny Unitas, known as "The Golden Arm," once held nearly every NFL passing record. (Sun file photo)

Aug. 16, 1997: The Orioles erupt for eight hits and seven runs in the sixth inning to defeat the Anaheim Angels, 10-9, at Camden Yards. B.J. Surhoff has six RBIs for first-place Baltimore.

Orioles left fielder B.J. Surhoff is congratulated by his teammates after his triple in the fifth inning of a 1997 game against the Mariners.
Orioles left fielder B.J. Surhoff is congratulated by his teammates after his triple in the fifth inning of a 1997 game against the Mariners. (John Makely /)

Aug. 12, 1980: Jockey Phil Grove rides four winners at Timonium Race Track, giving him a meet-leading 35. Grove, of Frederick, will total 3,990 victories before retiring to become a steward for the Maryland Racing Commission.

Advertisement

Aug. 14, 1959: Before a crowd of 70,000, including Vice President Richard Nixon, the world champion Colts rout the College All-Stars, 29-0, at Chicago’s Soldier Field. Johnny Unitas passes for three touchdowns and defensive back Milt Davis returns an interception for a score.

Aug. 17, 1958: The Orioles send just 29 men to the plate but defeat the Washington Senators, 2-1, at Memorial Stadium. Connie Johnson pitches a three-hitter and knocks in the winning run.

Aug. 15, 1949: On the first day of football practice at Navy, a record 300 plebes show up for drills at Farragut Field in Annapolis.

The Yankees' Babe Ruth swinging in 1924.
The Yankees' Babe Ruth swinging in 1924. (New York Daily News)

Aug. 12, 1927: A four-run, ninth-inning rally gives the International League Orioles an 8-7 victory over the soon-to-be world champion New York Yankees before 6,500 fans at Oriole Park. Babe Ruth homers for the Yankees but is tagged with the loss, pitching the last inning in relief.

Aug. 11, 1907: Training for a boxing match in Arcadia, Calif., Joe Gans, world lightweight champion from Baltimore, helps fight a brush fire threatening the town. “I guess I dropped a pound or two” beating the flames with wet sacks, Gans says. “But it’s [a lot] like fighting — hard on the nose and the eyes.”

Boxer Joe Gans
Boxer Joe Gans (Baltimore Sun)

Aug. 16, 1893: The Orioles’ Bill Hawke, 23, throws the first no-hitter in big league history with the pitcher’s mound at the new distance (60 feet, 6 inches) from home plate. Hawke, of Elkton, will win 16 games for Baltimore’s 1894 National League champions.

Maryland quarterback Jack Scarbath (left) and coach Jim Tatum led the Terps to the 1952 Sugar Bowl. Scarbath, the No. 3 overall pick by the Washington Redskins in the 1953 NFL draft, spent three seasons in the pros -- two with the 'Skins and one with the Pittsburgh Steelers.
Maryland quarterback Jack Scarbath (left) and coach Jim Tatum led the Terps to the 1952 Sugar Bowl. Scarbath, the No. 3 overall pick by the Washington Redskins in the 1953 NFL draft, spent three seasons in the pros -- two with the 'Skins and one with the Pittsburgh Steelers. (Sun photo)

Birthday

Aug. 12, 1930: Jack Scarbath (Poly), Maryland quarterback who led the 1951 Terps to a 28-13 upset of No. 1 Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl.

Advertisement
Advertisement