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The Sun Remembers: Nov. 13-19

Nov. 16, 1997: The Ravens compile nine sacks, a team record, but manage only a 10-10 tie against the Philadelphia Eagles before an announced 63,546 at Memorial Stadium. The first NFL tie in eight years leaves both teams with a 4-6-1 record.

Nov. 13, 1968: Earl Monroe scores 33 points and Kevin Loughery 24 points as the Bullets get their first victory in Cincinnati in four years, defeating the Royals, 115-111.

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Nov. 14, 1965: Subbing for the injured Johnny Unitas, Colts quarterback Gary Cuozzo passes for five touchdowns — a club record — in a 41-21 win over the Vikings in Minnesota. It's the seventh straight victory for Baltimore (8-1).

Nov. 19, 1950: The Colts blow a 20-0 lead in losing, 55-20, to New York at Municipal Stadium. Y.A. Tittle passes for two touchdowns for Baltimore, but the Giants rally for 48 points in the second half.

Nov. 18, 1938: Citing the "semi-professionalized system" in college sports, St. John's in Annapolis says it will abandon intercollegiate athletics in 1939. "Exhibitionism in [sports] does not interest us," says Stringfellow Barr, school president.

Nov. 13, 1929: On the final day of fall racing at Pimlico, a dense fog settles over the track. Neither the more than 15,000 fans, nor the track announcer, can see the horses until they hit the finish line.

Nov. 13, 1922: Before a large and curious crowd, Mary Johnson of New York, one of the few female professional pocket billiards players in the world, defeats Wallace Stott, the Maryland state champion, 100-94, at Kernan's billiard parlor.

Nov. 17, 1906: Make it seven shutouts this season for the Navy football team, a 40-0 winner over visiting North Carolina. Bill Richardson scores three touchdowns for the Midshipmen, who will finish 8-2-2 and with a 10-0 victory over Army.

Birthday

Nov. 18, 1969: Sam Cassell, a point guard from Dunbar who played 15 years in the NBA, averaging 15.7 points a game.

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