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Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti saw his franchise's value rise from $1.93 billion in 2016 to $2.3 billion, an increase of 19 percent. 
Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti saw his franchise's value rise from $1.93 billion in 2016 to $2.3 billion, an increase of 19 percent.  (Karl Merton Ferron/Baltimore Sun)

It's a great time to be an NFL owner.

The Ravens were ranked the 27th most valuable sports franchise by Forbes on Wednesday, the same spot they placed in last year's rankings. But the team's value rose from $1.93 billion in 2016 to $2.3 billion, an increase of 19 percent.

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The Cowboys, named the most valuable team in sports for the second straight year, this time at $4.2 billion, topped 29 NFL teams among the world's 50 most valuable. Only the Bengals, Lions and Bills missed the cut.

"Credit the massive profitability across the league — every team turned a profit of at least $26 million for the 2015 season," the Forbes article says. "NFL owners are also in line for a windfall from the relocations of the Rams, Chargers and Raiders. The other 29 teams will each receive more than $50 million in relocation fees, with none of that money shared with the players."

In Forbes' separate database of the world's billionaires, Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti was ranked the 474th richest man in the world with a net worth of $3.8 billion, an increase of $700 million from last year's valuation that ranked him 569th.

The NFL wasn't the only league to experience a rise in value, as the cutoff to qualify increased 18 percent this year to $1.75 billion. That left 36 franchises worth at least $1 billion outside the top 50.

The Rams were the biggest riser after relocating from St. Louis to Los Angeles, moving from outside the top 50 to No. 12 at $2.9 billion.

The NBA's Golden State Warriors, who won their second title in three seasons after adding superstar Kevin Durant, rose to No. 20 at $2.6 billion, an increase of 37 percent. Meanwhile, the New York Yankees led all of Major League Baseball at No. 2 at $3.7 billion, up 9 percent from their fourth overall ranking in 2016.

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