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Starting goalkeeper Gerald Logan still finding his voice for Johns Hopkins lacrosse

Johns Hopkins goalie Gerald Logan makes a first-half save against Navy.
Johns Hopkins goalie Gerald Logan makes a first-half save against Navy. (Lloyd Fox / Baltimore Sun)

In his debut as Johns Hopkins' starting goalkeeper, graduate student Gerald Logan turned away eight shots and gave up just eight goals in the No. 9 Blue Jays' 15-8 win against No. 11 Navy on Tuesday night at Homewood Field in Baltimore.

It was a solid beginning for Logan, the transfer from the University of Michigan who had outdueled junior incumbent Brock Turnbaugh for the right to man the cage. Coach Dave Pietramala said one of the reasons why Logan got the nod was the belief that his ability to make saves would compensate for his still-developing communication skills with an unfamiliar defense.

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"Ultimately our belief was that Gerald could maybe make a few more plays, and that the communication portion of things – where Brock is just phenomenal as a communicator and a leader – we could help Gerald with that," Pietramala said Thursday. "[Senior defenseman] Nick [Fields] could help him with that, [senior short-stick defensive midfielder] Joey Carlini could help him, [senior long-stick midfielder] Austin Spencer. And we made mistakes in those areas, and we've got to improve there. But the clearing game, I think we were at 90 percent [18-of-20]. Gerald made two or three nice plays out of the goal.

"Everyone wants to talk about [junior midfielder] Joel Tinney's hidden ball trick, and that was neat, but I thought one of the big turning points was when they were on extra-man [in the second half], and Gerald came out and deflected the ball, and we came up with the ground ball. If he doesn't make that play, they're creeping back into it again. So his ability to do those things and make some plays in the clearing game and make some plays outside of the goal are beneficial. He had a decent night in the cage."

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Pietramala expressed confidence that Logan would grow more vocal as he develops a comfort level with his teammates and the defensive system.

"I think it's just a comfort thing," he said. "… This is just a learned skill, and people have to change in life to better themselves. This is a situation where he's just got to grow and develop a greater level of comfort in doing what we need him to do."

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