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Stanwick brothers helping themselves and Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse

Fourteen times this spring, Johns Hopkins senior attackman Wells Stanwick and freshman attackman Shack Stanwick have connected for goals. Wells Stanwick has assisted on 11 of his younger brother's tallies, while Shack Stanwick has helped three of his older brother's goals.

According to Blue Jays coach Dave Pietramala, the Stanwick brothers – both of whom hail from Baltimore and graduated from Boys' Latin – work dutifully on their games and are often joined by older brother Steele, who is an assistant coach for the university's women's lacrosse program.

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"At least once a week, I'll look out of my office and out on [Homewood Field], I see Steele with Wells and Wells with Shack and the three of them are working on shooting and dodging," Pietramala said Wednesday. "It really is a cool thing to see them working with each other, three brothers trying to help each other. That's been very cool to watch.

"In terms of the two we have on the team, it's been a great dynamic. I would tell you that Wells has been extraordinarily demanding of Shack. If there's one person Wells is toughest on, it's his younger brother, and I think in the long run, that has helped us. It's kind of allowed [assistant] coach [Bobby] Benson to take a bit of a back seat there and work through Wells with Shack. And the two of them have got great chemistry."

Wells and Shack Stanwick will lead Johns Hopkins (10-6) into a NCAA Division I tournament quarterfinal against No. 2 seed Syracuse (13-2) on Sunday at 12 p.m. at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis. While the Stanwick pair are seeking their first Final Four appearance, Steele Stanwick can rest on the fact that he led Virginia to the 2011 national championship and won the Tewaaraton Award that season.

Pietramala said Wells and Shack Stanwick don't pay attention to outside expectations regarding whether they can match what their older brother achieved.

"From the day they've all shown up here, I think the pressure they have comes from within," he said. "They're all very competitive. They're all willing to put in extra time. You talk about great players and why they're great, it's because they put in extra time. These guys aren't afraid of working hard. So they put the extra time in. I think Shack is more like Steele. Wells is more of a joker, a little bit more of an Eddie Haskell type. He's got a lot more personality. The other two are a bit more quiet, more reserved. But I don't think they feel any pressure other than the pressure they put on themselves to perform."

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