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Second-best shooter in men's lacrosse? Towson's Joe Seider thinks there are others better than him

Towson's Joe Seider, left, drives against Loyola's Brian Begley in the first half of a college lacrosse game.
Towson's Joe Seider, left, drives against Loyola's Brian Begley in the first half of a college lacrosse game. (Steve Ruark / Baltimore Sun)

Joe Seider's reputation as a shooter for Towson is beginning to grow nationally with ESPN analyst Mark Dixon arguing that the junior attackman may be the next best shooter in the country after Johns Hopkins senior attackman Ryan Brown.

For his part, Seider downplayed the comparison.

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"I think there are a lot of great shooters out there that are probably better than I am," the Sparks resident and Hereford graduate said. "Ryan Brown is definitely the best shooter in the game right now. There are so many good players. Even on my team, we have a ton of good shooters. You just have to look at it as a great compliment, but you can't let it get to your head. You can't be worried about it and think, 'Oh my God, I have to perform at that level.' I just have to play the way I play."

Seider, who leads the No. 5 Tigers (5-0) in goals with 11 and ranks second in points with 13, said he tried to refine his form and technique by joining his father Alan to watch videos of two-time first-team All-American attackman Mark Millon of Massachusetts shooting, dodging and moving off-ball.

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"Over time, I've just tried to perfect what I do," Seider said. "You kind of have to know what your role is, and as a young kid in high school, I realized that I was a pretty decent shooter. So my dad and I would go out and shoot hundreds and hundreds of lacrosse balls after practice. We would analyze my form, and that's what made me the player I am at pretty much a young age. I think I started doing that as a 15-year-old because I knew I wanted to play in college."

Seider has worked to improve his ability to initiate and press opposing defenses, but coach Shawn Nadelen said Seider is at his best when he can find an opening and be a target for a teammate's pass.

"There will be times when the ball's in his stick and he needs to create, but a lot of times, with the players we have around him, hopefully the ball can find him with his hands free, and he'll have an opportunity to shoot well," Nadelen said. "He's not dodging different, he's not doing anything different as far as development and stuff. He's continuing to be Joe."

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