Advertisement

Floyd Mayweather Jr. wants Gervonta Davis on undercard of potential Conor McGregor fight

"I'm proud of 'Tank.' I want him to keep up the good work and keep working hard and he'll be back in the ring in a few months."

The boxing world wants to see Floyd Mayweather Jr. return from his two-year retirement to oppose Ultimate Fighting Championship star Conor McGregor in the ring.

Mayweather wants the same thing, too, with one accommodation (besides, you know, the millions of dollars he'll surely demand).

Advertisement

"If me and Conor McGregor do happen to make the fight happen, and I think that the fight will happen, I would love for this young kid to be on the undercard," Mayweather said Saturday night in London, where he had just watched Baltimore's Gervonta Davis, the aforementioned "young kid," make Mayweather Promotions' bet on his future look good again.

Davis defended his International Boxing Federation super-featherweight title with a third-round technical knockout of previously unbeaten Liam Walsh at Copper Box Arena. With the win, Davis, 22, moved to 18-0 in his career, with 17 knockouts.

"I thought that it was going to take a couple more rounds for him to get the guy out of there, but I take my hat off to Liam Walsh, he was a tough competitor," Mayweather said, according to CBS Sports. "I'm proud of 'Tank.' I want him to keep up the good work and keep working hard and he'll be back in the ring in a few months. We just want to take one fight at a time. There's no rush."

Mayweather, who last fought in September 2015, has been rumored to be in talks to fight McGregor since April 2016. His best work in the meantime might have come against Davis, who finished his training for Saturday's title defense with Mayweather in Las Vegas. Davis said earlier this month that they had worked "extra hard," running and working together in the gym until late at night.

"Just having him in my corner, I feel like I have a chance," he said. "I have that chance. I have one of the best in the sport backing me, so it means a lot."

The Twitter shout-outs must be nice, too.

Advertisement
Advertisement