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Five stats that stand out ahead of Sunday's Ravens-49ers game

The Ravens-49ers Super Bowl rematch doesn't have the luster anyone thought it would with both teams 1-4, but there's plenty of intrigue.

Here are five stats that stand out ahead of the game, including notes on the Ravens' propensity for giving up deep touchdowns, their fast pace, and the impact of tight end Crockett Gillmore as compared to his peers.

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25.5 – The Ravens don't run a hurry-up offense by any stretch of the word, but still rank fourth in the NFL with an offensive play every 25.5 seconds, according to Football Outsiders. There have been plenty of two-minute and end-of-game drives to keep those paces up, but there's also been plenty of short drives. John Harbaugh has lamented that the Ravens defense was on the field for 90 plays this week, so when the offense is generally moving this quickly but averages a three-and-out one out of four drives, it means little rest for a weary defense. That's important this week, as they'll likely be chasing San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick around all day Sunday.

29 – Opposing quarterbacks average 7.6 yards per attempt against the Ravens, but a cringe-worthy 29 yards per touchdown pass against the Ravens. Yes, there was the 68-yard touchdown to Amari Cooper against Oakland and the 80-yard touchdown by A.J. Green of Cincinnati, but the Ravens aren't exactly getting dinked and dunked down the field when it comes to touchdown passes. Why does it matter? Well, 49ers wide receiver Torrey Smith is known to take the top off a defense a few times every game. He wouldn't be the first to find the end zone on such a pass against this Ravens defense.

65.5 – Think the Ravens offense has been missing something these last few weeks? By one measure, it's been the best tight end in football. Crockett Gillmore's DVOA on Football Outsiders, a statistic that measures how much value over an average player at the position a player adds on a per-play basis, is 65.5 percent. That's the best in the league. His 151 yards and two touchdowns in the two-plus games he's played have been a lot of yards after the catch and yards after contact, both of which Gillmore has generated. San Francisco is middle-of-the-pack against tight ends, allowing an average of four catches and 40 yards per game.

11 – Kaepernick is second among quarterbacks and tied for 23rd among all players with 11 rushing first-downs this season, exemplifying the threat that he poses the Ravens in that phase. Given their propensity of sending extra pressure on third down this season, someone will surely be tasked with keeping an eye on Kaepernick in the pocket to try and prevent him from impacting the game with his legs. Let's not forget his seven carries for 62 yards and a touchdown in the Super Bowl.

49.4 – Ravens defensive coordinator Dean Pees lamented the fact that the defense can't get off the field on third down, and only one team has a worst third-down stop rate than the Ravens' 49.4. The silver lining? San Francisco is almost just as bad, with a 44.3 percent stop rate ranking 29th in the NFL. The Ravens only convert one out of three third-downs on offense, so it's not like they're primed to take advantage of it, but this could lead to some long drives Sunday at Levi's Stadium.

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